Skip to main content

Full text of "Alpha"

See other formats



Ysi^jL^tzd; ^y 





DR. ZENOS E. SCOn 



ALPHA 

1936 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

STUDENTS 

OF THE 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

BRIDGEWATER - MASSACHUSETTS 



VOLUME NO. 
XXXVIII 



TO 

FRILL GERTRUDE BECKWITH 

Teacher of Handicrafts at Bridgewater 

from 1914 to 1935 

and 

HARLAN PAGE SHAW 

Teacher of Physiography and Science at 

Bridgewater from 1890 to 1936 

The Class of 1936 
affectionately dedicates this book in appre- 
ciation of their years of enthusiastic service 
to the finest ideals of this college. 




FRILL G. BECKWITH 



FRILL GERTRUDE BECKWITH 
Artist and Teacher of Art 



Frill Gertrude Beckwith was born in Bay City, Michigan, where she lived until she 
prepared for college in Ann Arbor. In college she "did not brag of taking Art for 
fear of being accused of looking for snaps." She took all courses offered in Art, 
however, having studied it privately since childhood. At the end of her second col- 
lege year she was offered an opportunity to go to an Art School in the East, provided 
she proved that she could teach. She was very successful in teaching both Art and 
Manual Training, but was influenced to choose the latter through her study with Miss 
Osterholm, "a graduate of Finland's finest school, Sweden's finest school, and Colum- 
bia as well." 

Miss Beckwith says, "Out of a clear sky I decided on Boston. Some one told me 
of Agassiz's daughter (Mrs. Shaw) and all she was doing. I do not know what good 
fairy guided me. Not alone the school but the influence of Mrs. Shaw was something 
that cannot be expressed in mere words." 

While studying in Boston, Miss Beckwith taught in a number of Settlement Houses, 
and at Chestnut Hill Private School. 

Then back to Michigan, to supervise Manual Training (cooking, sewing, wood- 
work, and craft work) in Lansing, with the special problem of keeping over-age boys 
in school. So skillfully did she solve this problem that she was called to Yakima, 
Washington, to do the same thing. After another year of study, Miss Beckwith re- 
ceived calls from Los Angeles and from Bridgewater. 

This account is finished in Miss Beckwith 's own words. 

"I accepted Bridgewater, where I spent twenty-one delightful years. Any one who 
knows anything of Dr. Boyden knows that means getting the best and giving the best. 

"While at Bridgewater I had a wonderful experience — 'My trip abroad.' I went to 
the International Art Congress at Prague with Dr. Henry Turner Bailey. I consider that 
I have been very fortunate. First Dr. Angell of Michigan University; second, Dr. 
Boyden,- and third, Dr. Bailey — all masters of the Art of Living. 

"I am sorry I had so short a time with Dr. Scott. During the time I was with him I 
felt his enthusiasm, and his appreciation of what I tried to do. I felt his courage, under- 
standing, and sympathy. 

"I start in once more studying Art in Detroit next week. Wish me luck. I think I 
have found another wonderful teacher." 



HARLAN PAGE SHAW 
SCIENTIST AND TEACHER OF SCIENCE 

Harlan Page Shaw was born July 31, 1866, in Waterville, Nova Scotia. He re- 
ceived his early education in the schools of Berwick, Nova Scotia, and in Horton Col- 
legiate Academy, Wolfville, Nova Scotia. 

For two years he was manager of his father's orchard and farm, and then spent one 
year at machinist's tools and woodworking in Worcester, Mass. Mr. Shaw returned to 
Nova Scotia, and studied one year to pass the provincial examinations for a teacher's 
license. For a short time he was principal and teacher of a primary school, and enjoyed 
this work. 

In September, 1 886, Mr. Shaw entered Bridgewater Normal School, and was gradu- 
ated from the four years' course with high rank. During the last three years as a student 
at this school, he also taught woodworking to all of the Normal students. Despite all 
these activities, Mr. Shaw found time for school athletics, excelling in the pole vault, 
tennis, and football. 

Mr. Shaw became a regular member of the Normal School faculty in September 
1 890, and has continued to the present time. While carrying a full-time teaching pro- 
gram at Bridgewater, Mr. Shaw has also covered much outside study in connection with 
the Lowell School of Science, M. I. T., Hyannis Summer School and Harvard. These 
courses have been in physiography, geology and chemistry. He has taken many field 
studies in geology in company with N. S. Shaler and J. B. Woodworth of Harvard, and 
W. O. Crosby and George H. Barton of Technology. Four summers Mr. Shaw taught 
mineralogy and chemistry at Hyannis Summer School. For a short time preceding the 
appointment of Dr. Zenos Scott, he was acting president of Bridgewater State Teachers 
College. 

Mr. Shaw has published "A Course in Woodworking," "The Study of Minerals," 
"Laboratory Course in Elementary Chemistry," "Outlines of Historical Geology," and 
"A Course in General Science." 

Mr. Shaw's varied interests have led him to association with many scientific educa- 
tional societies. For twelve years he was a member of the Bridgewater School Com- 
mittee, and the Town Planning Board. He has always been active in civic affairs. 

For forty-six years, Mr. Shaw has not lost even a single half-day of teaching 
because of illness. 

Evidently teaching runs in Mr. Shaw's family. Teachers in his immediate family in- 
clude his father, two of his brothers, one sister, and five of his sons and daughters. One 
of his brothers, Dr. Avery A. Shaw, is now president of Denison University, Granville, 
Ohio. 




HARLAN P. SHAW 



CLASS ODE — 1936 

Four short years have we trod in thy footsteps, 
Years spent with hard work, friends, and fun,- 

But forever we'll practice thy precepts, 
Our guide in the years to come. 

Chorus 

We are-sad to be leaving thy portals, 

We realize all you have done, 
Ever we'll tread in the light of thy beacon 

That brings guidance to each one,- 
As we go from the source of our learning, 

We pause, paying tribute to thee, 
Alma Mater dear, we will ever cheer, 

And bring fame to B. T. C. 

Now as we're leaving this, our College, 
Enriched with pow'r gained from thee, 

Ever we'll strive to use all of our knowledge 
To praise our B. T. C. 

Carol Farr 



v^ -&&^ 



•*** 



# 






JOSEPH I. ARNOLD 
Social Science 



ALICE B. BEAL 
Supervisor of Training 



EDITH H. BRADFORD 
Modern Languages 



FACULTY 




MARY I. CALDWELL 
Physical Education 



JULIA C. CARTER 
Library 



FRANK A. CROSIER 
Physical Education 



RUTH E. DAVIS 
English 




LOIS L. DECKER 
Physical Education 



CHARLES E. DONER GEORGE H. DURGIN 

Penmanship Mathematics 



*1936 




E. IRENE GRAVES 
Science 



M. KATHERINE HILL 
Literature 



PAUL V. HUFFINGTON 
Geography 




BRENELLE HUNT 
Psychology 



JOHN J. KELLY 
Dean of Men 



OLIVE H. LOVETT 
English 



IVA V. LUTZ 
Methods 




L. ADELAIDE MOFFITT 
English 



PRISCILLA M. NYE 
Art 



S. ELIZABETH POPE 
Dean of Women 



' 




FRIEDA RAND 
Muse 



GORDON L. REYNOLDS 
Art 



MARY V. SMITH 
History 



FACULTY 



\ .&$ 


,/K 


1 


w ■«? 


y. 




9jH^§Ljv#; 


• , M 




^^Sk M 







LOUIS C. STEARNS 
Science; Garden 




BALFOUR S. TYNDALL 
Science 



CORA M. VINING 
Library 



MARTHA M. BURNELL 
Principal of Training School 




GLADYS L. ALLEN 
Grade Two 



LOUISE H. BORCHERS 
Grade Five 



LUCY B. BRALEY 
Grade Three 



1936 




EVELYN R. LINDQUIST 
Grade Six 



NEVAJ 1 !. LOCKWOOD 
Grade Six 



MARY L. MARKS 
Kindergarten 




KATHERINE PACKARD 
Grade Four 



GERTRUDE M. ROGERS 
Grade Two 



HELEN E. SLEEPER 
Grade Four 



GRACE E. SMITH 
Grade One 




FLORA M. STUART CHARLOTTE M. THOMPSON A. MABELLE WARNER 

Grade One Grade Three Grade Five 



ALPHA - 1936 



INTERPRETATION OF THE ART WORK IN ALPHA 

The layout and illustrations of this year's Alpha have been designed in keeping 
with today's trend. The central themes of the illustrations are handcrafts and science, 
these subjects being chosen because the book is dedicated to Miss Beckwith and 
Mr. Shaw. 

The following outline gives the central theme in each of the illustrated pages: 

END SHEETS: Science and handcrafts symbolized in objects carried by student. 

CLASSES: Science symbolized in experimentation with nature. 

STUDENT CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION: Science and the handcrafts 
symbolized in student activities leading to central figure, the head of the Student 
Co-operative Association. 

CLUBS: Handcrafts symbolized in central figure of a puppet, holding strings to 
various clubs of the college. 

ATHLETICS: Science symbolized in force and strain of athletes. 



ART ASSISTANTS 
Ralph Nelson, John Julin, Dorothy Perkins, Kathleen Kelly, Joseph Chicetti. 



APPRECIATION 

The Editorial Board of Alpha for 1936 wish to extend our sincere appreciation 
to Miss Davis, Miss Nye, Miss Pope, and Mr. Kelly, our faculty advisers, in acknowl- 
edgement of their valuable assistance in the publishing of this book. We also thank 
all members of the college who have aided in making the task of publishing the Alpha 
a most enjoyable and profitable experience. 



ALPHA - 1936 




Row 2 — G. Morrison, R. Zeoli, R. Nelson, J. True, F. Moron, G. Johnston, T. Michelson. 
Row 1 — H. Kovalchuk, L. Kavanaugh, R. Bumpus, Miss Davis, N. Dean. 



ALPHA BOARD 



Editor-in-Chief Ruth Bumpus 

Assistant Editor Lucile Kavanaugh 

Business Manager John True 

Assistant Business Manager Richard Zeoli 

Treasurer Gordon Morrison 

Staff Photographer Francis Moran 

Assistant Staff Photographer Theodore Ehrhardt 

Advertising Manager Thomas Michelson 

Assistant Advertising Manager George Johnston 

Staff Artist Helen Kovalchuk 

Assistant Staff Artist Ralph Nelson 

Literary Editor Natalie Dean 



When we, as Freshmen, entered Boyden Hall, 

And looked around with eager, searching eye, 

The first to meet our glance 

Was that set high above the door's wide arch, 

A creed: — Bridgewater's Creed, 

Which we shall love and cherish evermore, 

"Not to be ministered unto, but to minister." 

That motto old which did our entrance hail 
Is more than words of bronze upon the wall; 
It forms the doctrine clear 
By which we spend our pleasant college days, 
And doubtless it will guide our future years,- 
A creed: — Bridgewater's Creed, 
"Not to be ministered unto, but to minister." 
— Richard Dwyer. 






ALPHA 
193 6 



SENIORS 

President Stephen Lovett 

Vice-President. , Ruth Flaherty 

Secretary . Ruth Davis 

Treasurer Catherine Graham 



History 

September, 1932 — Orchid- ribbons and shopping bags, red caps and green ties — 

thus we arrived, full of pep, but afraid to show it! Worried Freshmen. 
September, 1933 — Growing up! Combined Sophomore-Junior prom for the first 

time. Progressive Sophomores. 
September, 1934 — Training — committees — prom — winter meet — Campus Carnivals. 

Energetic Juniors. 
September, and on, 1935 — Philosophizing Education, 84 lit students pursuing Shake- 
speare, "Van Doling," promming. Sedate Seniors. 

This in brief, accounts for our activities during the four short years we've been 
here. Logically critical, desiring new things, thus we have progressed. 

The combined Sophomore-Junior prom, in Davy Jones' locker, our second year, 
we shall never forget. 

Learning through experience, we made the Senior dance completely outshine all 
of our others, both socially and financially. 

Starting a new custom, we presented a senior chapel program which depicted 
subjects which are typically Senior. 

As usual, Christmas cards were for sale. The tendency this year was toward 
the idea of Bridgewater, the college, and the campus. 

The spring chapel program presented a pre-view of Class Day for the benefit 
of the entire school. 

Tableaux at Class Day as usual, but dealing with the unusual — "How Govern- 
ments, Ancient and Modern, Affect Education." 

The finale — June 8, prom; June 1 2, Ivy March. 

Ruth Davis, Secretary 



SENIORS 




BARBARA HELEN ALBRET 

- 88 Brush Hill Road, Milton. President of 
S. C. A. 4. Campus Comment 1, 2, 3. Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Library Club 3, 4. Alpha 
Representative 1 . Orchestra 1,2,3, 4; Student 
Director 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

An inspiration, dignified when the situation 
requires it, ever erudite, dextrous in all she 
does, Barb is greatly admired and beloved by 
everyone. 



ELSIE RANGHILD INGEGARD 
ANDERSON 

7 Emerald Street, East Bridgewater. Campus 
Comment 2. W. A. A. 1, 2,4. 

Beneath her keen, quick-witted, argumentative 
spirit there lies poetic genius. 



ELEANOR WOOD APPLEFORD 

29 Burton Avenue, Whitman. Garden Club 
1, 2. Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Topics-of-Day Club 
2,3. W. A. A. 1,2,4. 

Eleanor is deep, taciturn at times, more often 
sociable, and constantly thoughtful. 




DOROTHEA ASH 

43 School Street, Quincy. W. A. A. 4. 

Dorothea — from Regis College — always un- 
assuming, humorously cynical. 




AGNES ATHAN 

932 Kempton Street, New Bedford. Camera 
Club 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 
2, 3, 4. 

Agnes is decisive and keenly but subtly 
amusing. A sincere and cordial friend. 



ALPHA 



HERMAN COYTO BAPTISTE — 

75 Crapo Street, New Bedford. Men's Club 
1,2,3,4. B. T. C. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

Bap is the thoughtful member of the class 
and a temperamental musician. Remember 
him industriously collecting more or less ac- 
curate news for the New Bedford paper? 



JOHN FRANCIS BARROWS 

316 Quincy Avenue, East Braintree. Glee 
Club 3, 4. Men's Club 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 4. 
B. T. C. A. A. 2, 3, 4. 

Johnnie, B. T. C.'s helpful orchestral manager, 
came to us as a sophomore from Fitchburg. For 
transportation he depends upon his trusty Ford, 
which daily brings his effervescent personality 
into our midst. 



BELLE BARSKY _ 

43 Windsor Street, Roxbury. Topics-of-Day 
Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 3 ; President 4. 
Chairman of Poster Committee 4. W. A. A. 4. 

Grave in bearing, definite and precise in man- 
ner, she is ruled by a fine artistic sense. 




a 19 36 




DOROTHY SWIFT BEARSE 

Main Street, Cotuit. Library Club 3, 4. 
Treasurer of Woodward 4. W. A. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4. 

Dot, light-hearted and unconcerned, has a 
way of making things run smoothly. 



CLARENCE NEWTON BLAIR — 

56 Tremont Street, South Braintree. Men's 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Secretary 3. Hobby 
Club 1, 2. Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Topics-of- 
Day Club 2, 3, 4. B. T. C. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Big-hearted Hank, the dramatic star of the 
class, can be relied upon to sell you the best of 
candy, to do anything you may ask within 
reason, and to laugh with you when the joke is 
on him. 



WILFRED KINGSTON BRADBURY - 
497 June Street, Fall River. Men's Club 1, 2, 




497 June 
),4. B.T. 



C. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 



"No kiddin'," Brad is one of the best-natured 
fellows to be found. 



RUTH VANNAH BUMPUS 

1 56 Clifton Avenue, Brockton. Campus Com- 
ment 1, 2. Kindergarten-Primary Club, 1, 2. 
Alpha 1 , 2, 3, 4 ; Assistant Editor 3: Editor- 
in-Chief 4. Secretary of Class 1. Orchestra 
1,2,3,4. W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Unobtrusive, and yet decidedly distinguished, 
Ruth's poise makes her master over all trying 
situations. 




ALICE MIRIAM CARR 

30 Janvrin Avenue, Revere. French Club 
1, 2, 3- Secretary 3. Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Lib- 
rary Club 4. Topics-of-Day Club 4. Chair- 
man of Chapel Committee 4. Treasurer of 
Dormitory Council 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

If Al isn't singing down the corridor, you may 
be quite sure that she is wildly gesticulating 
to help enrich some dryly-witty conversation. 



PAUL BENEDICT CASEY 

124 Central Street, Rockland. Glee Club 
1 , 2, 3. Men's Club 1 , 2, 3, 4. B. T. C. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. Secretary N. A. A. 4. 

Was there a fallacy in your reasoning you 
hoped would pass unnoticed? You forgot 
Casey was there! Keen minded, carefree "Case" 
was always there with an answer. 



ALPHA 



RITA HELEN CASSIDY 

101 Magazine Street, Cambridge. Library 
Club 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 3. Day Student Coun- 
cil 1,4. W. A. A. 4. 

Rita is a typical, poised Bostonian, politely 
bored. 



MARGUERITE MARIE CHIROS 

65 Court Street, Whitman. Garden Club 1. 
Hobby Club 1. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3,4. 

The ever-knifting-and-crocheting-commuter is 
our unconsciously humorous Marguerite. 




• 1936 



MARIE ELIZABETH COLLINS 

929 Southern Artery Street, Quincy. Topics- 
of-DayClub4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Dignified in appearance, Marie is good com- 
pany as she always does the unexpected. 



CAROL LYDIA COULTER 

104 Franklin Street, Brookville. Topics-of- 
DayClub3,4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

To Carol, well-known for her boyish haircut 
and soft drawl, is paid the fine tribute of being 
unanimously considered unaffected. 




ALFRED ELMER COX 

192 Summer Street, Bridgwater. Me 
4. B. T. C. A. A. 4. 




Club 



This confident member of the senior class 
came here from Mass. State. He certainly 
tries hard in all his courses. He should get 
somewhere! 



RUTH MARJORIE CRONIN 

51 Glenwood Avenue, Pittsfield. French 
Club 1, 2, 3, A; Vice-President 3. Glee Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 3, 4. Vice-President 
of S. C. A. 4. Dormitory Council 3. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Versatile, vivacious, true to the finest ideals 
of our college, Ruth has endeared herself to all 
with her contagious personality. 




HAZEL MARY CROWDIS 

16 Randlett Street, Wollaston. Camera Club 
3, 4. Kindergarten-Primary Club 3, 4; Treasu- 
rer 4. W. A. A. 2, 3. 4. 

One of our most rugged athletes, Hazel is 
outspoken, but not unkindly so, and yet she 
reveals herself shy by always smothering her 
laugh. 



ANNA MARIE CRUICE 

19 Farrington Street, Brockton. Campus Com- 
ment 3. Kindergarten-Primary Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Anna goes her own way quietly, but may be 
relied upon to have given her best to all her 
activities. 



ALPHA 



RITA MARGARET CUSHING 

90 Livingston Street, Pittsfield. Glee Club 
1 , 2, 3, 4; Librarian 2. Class Representative 1 . 
Student Council 1, 4. Chairman of Lecture 
Fund 4. Vice-President of Dormitory Council 
3. W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

A winning smile is a great asset to our director 
of chapel singing. With her executive ability, 
Rita is bound to be successful. 



ELIZABETH ANNE CUSICK 

147 Kent Street, Brookline. Campus Com- 
ment 2. Garden Club 4. Girl Scouts 1,2,3. 
Science Club 4. Topics-of-Day Club 1 . Treas- 
urer of Tillinghast Hall 4. German Club 3, 4. 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3,4. 

Quietly alert but usually decorous, Betty is at 
times surprisingly argumentative. 




&1936 




ISABELLE ROSE DACEY 

68 Putnam Street, East Weymouth. Kinder- 
garten-Primary 2. Topics-of-Day 2. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Isabelle is an enthusiastic punster who will en- 
liven any conversation with her quick retorts 
accompanied by a characteristic toss of the head. 



RUTH MARGARET DAVIS 



99 Upland Road, Quincy. 
2,3,4. W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 



Dramatic Club 



If you want to be entertained, find Ruth. 
She is usually harmonizing if she isn't up to 
some mischief. 



NORMA JOSEPHINE DELORY 

54 Stanton Street, Rockland. W. A. A. 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Aesthetic Norma, renowned for her interest 
in the dance, is an unusually willing and co- 
operative worker. 




FLORENCE SARAH DILLON 

1 2 Georgia Road, South Weymouth. Garden 
Club 1, 2. Hobby Club 2, 3. Kindergarten- 
Primary Club 1, 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

At all times Florence may be depended upon 
to do the sensible thing. She is brisk but firm 
in her convictions. 




NATALIE PIERCE DEAN 

26 Rich Street, Waltham. Dramatic Club 4. 
Alpha 4. Topics-of-Day Club 1, 2. Chair- 
man of Handbook Committee 3, 4. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Who among us does not envy Nat her ease 
in doing things seemingly impossible? Gifted 
with unlimited enthusiasm and a vivacious per- 
sonality, the fear of boredom need never worry 
her. 



ANNA LORETTA DRINKWATER 

21 7 Winthrop Street, Taunton. Topics-of- 
Day Club 3. W. A. A. 1,2, ,3 4. 

Though she goes her way with an uncon- 
cerned air, you will find Anna a remarkably 
broad-minded and willing listener. 



ALPHA 



DOROTHY LINCOLN EDSON 

25 Overlook Terrace, North Adams. Gar- 
den Club 4. Library Club 4. W. A. A. 3, 4. 

Dee is calmly unconcerned and happy-go- 
lucky under all circumstances. 



PHYLLIS ESAU 

45 Bryant Street, East Milton. Kindergarten- 
Primary Club 2, 3; Secretary 3. Library 2, 3, 4. 
W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Sincere, constant and generous, Phyl divides 
her enthusiasm between literary pursuits and 
sports — particularly tennis. 




* 1 9 36 




MURIEL LILLIAN EYRE 

57 Savoie Street, Fall River. Campus Com- 
ment 2, 3, 4,- Executive editor 4. Glee Club 
1,2,3,4. Dormitory CounciM, 2, 3. W. A. 
A. 1,2,3, 4. 

Winsome always, trim and exacting in per- 
son and activities, Muriel has been the petite 
but energetic editor of Campus Comment. 



CAROL VIRGINIA FARR 

Tilley Street, Granby. Hobby Club 4. Kin- 
dergarten-Primary Club 3, 4. Topics-of-Day 
Club 1,2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

Poetic, sometimes cheery, more often serious- 
minded, industrious Carol accomplishes more in 
less time than seems humanly possible. 



REBECCA BURTON FAUNCE 

105 North Avenue, North Abington. Top- 
ics-of-Day Club 3, 4. Vice-President of Day 
Student Council 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Becky is determined but gaily daring in all 
she undertakes to do. She has the courage 
of her own convictions. 



RUTH EDNA FLAHERTY 

30 Tapley Street, Lynn. Glee Club 1 , 2, 3, 4. 
Division Representative 2. Vice-President of 
Class 3, 4. Student Council 2, 3. Camera 
Club 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Attractive in manner as well as looks; accom- 
plished and of an engaging personality. 





MARY ANN FREEMAN 

17 Nursery Street, Whitman. Hobby Club 1. 
Topics-of-Day Club 1, 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3,4. 

Mary possesses that rare virtue, modesty, and 
an understanding, deep-feeling nature. 



ALPHA 



GERTRUDE VIRGINIA FRENCH 

1 8 Wright Street, Stoneham. Glee Club 1 , 2, 
3, 4. Vice-President of Class 1 , 2. President 
of Woodward Dormitory 4. W. A. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4. 

Efficient and dependable in presiding at 
Woodward as in all else, Trudie is candid, but 
discreetly so. 



VERONICA KATHERINE GAYNOR 

44 Maple Street, Randolph. W. A. A. 2, 3 ,4. 

Suave, congenial to all her associates, Veron- 
ica is self-reliant. 



MARGARET ELVA GILLIAT 

Wellfleet. Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Secretary 4. 
W. A. A. 1,2,3,4. 

Capable and fun-loving, Peggy's twinkling 
eyes are evidence of her spirited nature. 







ft 1 9 36 



CATHERINE ELIZABETH GILMARTIN 

96 Glover Avenue, North Quincy. Glee 
Club 3, 4. Library Club 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 
1,4- 

Kay is competent and resolute, yet always 
gives the appearance of being languid. 



CHARLOTTE ROSE GOLDING 

44 Tremont Street, Campello. Hobby Club 
1,2,3. W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Companionable, earnest, and eager to make 
each opportunity an added success. 




CATHERINE DARLING GRAHAM 

28 Granite Street, Whitinsville. Treasurer of 
Class 4. W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Cathie is smooth-appearing, smartly dressed, 
and self-possessed. 




BARBARA LOUISE GREENWOOD 

15 Linden Street, Whitinsville, Woodward 
House Board 2, 3, 4. Dormitory Council 2, 3, 
4. Student Council 4. President of Dormi- 
tory Council 4. Treasurer of Woodward 3. 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Corresponding Secretary 3. 

Collegiate if ever anyone was, Barb is chic 
and polished. 




CAROL WINIFRED GRIFFITHS 

40 Cocassett Street, Foxboro. French Club 
1, 2. Glee Club 3, 4. Library Club 3, 4,- 
Vice-President 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Music is her chief interest; tolerance her 
motto; neatness her law. 



ALPHA 



FRANCES GUERIN 

76 Cross Street, East Bridgewater. W. A. A. 4 

We thank Boston University (or a keen con- 
versationalist, entertaining and clever. 



THELMA HARRIET GUNDERSON 

20 Fenno Street, Wollaston. Campus Com- 
ment Musical Comedy 3. Garden Club 4. 
Glee Club 3. Kindergarten-Primary Club 3. 
W. A. A. 3, 4. 

Snappy eyes, snappy taste, and snappy 
answers, combined with an inviting nonchalance 
— Gunny. 



ALICE ELEANOR HALLORAN 

197 Bruce Street, Lawrence. Campus Com- 
ment. 2. French Club 1, 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 
1 , 2, 3, 4; President 4. 

Al is composed, possesses a subtle humor, and 
appears inaccessible. 




* 1 9 3 6 




LAWRENCE HALZEL 

31 Deering Road, Mattapan. Campus Com- 
ment 3, 4. Men's Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Topics-of- 
Day Club 4. Member of Lecture Fund Committee 
4. B. T. C. A. A. 1,2,3,4. 

Larry is a quiet-spoken, industrious sort of per- 
son — unless aroused. What will set him off? 
Try politics. 



EDITH HAYDEN 

45 Ruggles Street, Quincy. Campus Com- 
ment 1, 2, 3, 4; Associate Editor 2; News Edi- 
tors. Alumni Editor 4. Hobby Club 1. Alpha 
1,2. W. A. A. 1,2,3,4. 

Breezy and spontaneous, striking looking, and 
humane in all her actions. 




PEARL BEAUMONT HEYWORTH 

1255 Wilson Road, Fall River. Garden Club 
4. Topics-of-Day Club 1 . Treasurer of Til- 
linghast Hall 3. W. A. A. t, 2, 3, 4. 

Pearl is kindly toward all, and lives in a bliss- 
ful calm. 



MARJORIE SPRAY HOLLENBECK 

10 Third Street, Onset. Garden Club 2, 3. 
Cape Train Representative 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4. 

Always sedate, Spray is exact in all she 
does. 




ANNA MARIE HOUDE 

9 Track Street, Brockton. Hobby Club 1, 2, 
3. Kindergarten-Primary Club 3. Topics-of- 
Day Club 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3,4. 

Dignified and reserved, Anna is indifferent 
to public opinion, unswerving in her efforts. 



ALPHA 






ADELAIDE WALBORG JOHNSON 

Bay Street, North Easton. Garden Club 3, 4. 
Topics-of-Day Club 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Adelaide is youthfully radiant; her nose, 
pert; her eyes, saucy; her ability, great. 



ELSA DOROTHY JOHNSON 

14 Jackson Street, Attleboro. Dramatic Club 
2, 3, 4; Secretary 3; President 4. Garden Club 
1. W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

An idealist — tolerant and optimistic — Elsa 
lives intensely as is evidenced by her dramatic 



EVERETT ALBERT JOHNSON 

156 South Street, Avon. Men's Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. Science Club 1, 2, 3, B. T. C. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Joe's nemesis is the conquering of the art of 
ping-pong. If the teachings of Fibber McGee 
were educational, he would be an A+ student. 
His work in the office will stand him in good 
stead in his certain future executive positions. 




* 1 936 



HUBERT JOHNSON 



55 Banks Street, Attleboro. 

B.T.C.A.A.4, 



Men's Club 4. 



Hugh came and left before we knew him very 
well, but he impressed us with his dignified man- 
ner and his easy, polished speech. 



KATHERINE LOUISE JOHNSON 

55 Banks Street, Attleboro. Campus Com- 
ment 1, 2, 3, 4; Technical Editor 3; Editor-in- 
Chief 3. German Club 3, 4; Secretary 4. Gar- 
den Club 1. W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Kay, though impulsive, is clever. Her eyes 
are earnest, her smile and manner are cordial. 




FRANCES DORIS JONES 

123 Blackstone Street, Fall River. Garden 
Club 4. Girl Scouts 1. Treasurer of Tilling- 
hast 2. Science Club 3, 4; President 4. Topics- 
of-Day Club 1 . Class representative 1 . W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3,4. 

Classic in appearance, Doris is enterprising, 
and a scientific thinker. 




DORIS CONSTANCE KELLEHER 

12 Eleventh Avenue, Haverhill. Dormitory 

Council 3, 4: Secretary 4. Student Council 2, 

3, 4. Class Representative 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Adaptable to any situation, thorough, Doris 
is amiable to everyone. 




DANIEL KELLY 

614 Maple Street, Fall River. Men's Club 
1,2,3,4, B.T. C. A. A. 1,2,3,4. 

A natural athlete if there ever was one, but in- 
disposed. You've often seen this quiet, cheer- 
ful fellow drinking the perfect food in the men's 
room or puttering around the print shop. 



ALPHA 



41 Miller 
Comment 1. 
Glee Club 1. 
2,3,4. 



HILDA KIDSTON 

Style Road, Quincy. Campus 
Dramatic Club 2, 3; Secretary 3. 
Topics-of-Day Club 4. W. A. A. 



Dynamic in every way, Hilda is a clever- 
tongued mimic and entertainer. 



HELEN CECILIA KILLORY 

130 Moraine Street, Brockton. From Hy- 
annis T. C. W. A. A. 3, 4. 

Blase, with a refined sense of humor, Helen 
possesses much-admired eyes. 



HELEN KOVALCHUK 

70 Green Street, Rockland. Camera Club 4. 
Campus Comment 2. Garden Club 1, 2, 3. 
Alpha Art Editor 4. Topics-of-Day Club 1. 
W. A. A. 1,2,3, 4. 

Distinguished in bearing, competent in every- 
thing she undertakes, with infinite artistic ability. 




* 1 9 3 6 



EVELYN FRANCES LAFAVER 

5 Lincoln Street, Merrimac. Glee Club 3, 4. 
Hobby Club 1. Kindergarten-Primary Club 3. 
Secretary, 4. Student Council Chairman of 
Library Committee. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Evie is sympathetic, a good listener, consid- 
erate, and conscientious. 



RACHEL JACKSON LANE 

8 Cushing Street, Amesbury. Girl Scouts 1. 
Glee Club 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Rachel, serious, capable, and hard-working, 
is outstanding (or her glorious red hair. 




ALICE AMELIA LARSON 

53 Martin Street, Attleboro. Campus Com- 
ment 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant Technical Editor 3,- 
Technical Editor 4. Garden Club 1, 2. Ger- 
man Club 3, 4; Vice-President 4. Hobby 
Club 1. W. A. A. 1,2,3,4. 

Wholesome and refreshing, Al is kindly, dis- 
creet. 



MARIE MARTHA LEBOURDAIS 

271 Plymouth Street, North Abington. Glee 
Club 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

Frank but loyal, Marie is confident and con- 
genial. 





IDA LEINO 

P. O. Box 2, Sagamore. Campus Comment 
1 , 2, 3, 4. Garden Club 1 . President of Day 
Student Council 4. Secretary Pro-tern of Day 
Student Council. W. A. A. 1 , 2, 4. 

To all, the jolly, sparkling leader of the com- 
muters is irresistible. 



ALPHA 



HELEN LOUISE LEONARD 

23 Fruit Street, Taunton. French Club 3, 4. 
Librarian 4. Topics-of-Day 3, 4. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Impulsive, then cautious, Helen is paradoxical 
— an enigma. 



STEPHEN LOVETT 

455 South Street, Bridgewater. President of 
Class 1, 2, 3, 4. Camera Club 4. Campus 
Comment, Sports Editor 2. Glee Club 1 . Men's 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Science Club 2. B. T. C. A. 
A. 1,2,3,4. 

Steve, our tall, argumentative Westerner, has 
proved his exceptional quality of leadership by 
being class president for four years. 



BERNICE DEAN LUDDEN 

45 Thaxter Street, Abington. Girl Scouts 

2, 3; Treasurer 3. Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Librarian 

3. Class Representative 4. Chairman of Civic 
Committee 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Apparently nonchalant and impersonal, Bun- 
ny is really rather shyly fraternal. 




* 1 9 3 6 




CLEMENT LYNCH 

439 Main Street, Bridgewater. Men's Club 
1,2,3,4. B. T. C. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Clem is a lot of fun in class when he airs his 
dry wit. He also cuts a rare figure on the 
basketball floor. Remember his outstanding ex- 
planations of physiographic features and charts? 



MARY MacDONALD 

111 Heywood Street, Worcester. Kinder- 
garten-Primary Club 4. Library Club 4. Top- 
ics-of-Day Club 4. W. A. A. 4. 

From Fitchburg she came — confident and 
amiable. 




MARGUERITE ELIZABETH MAHADY 

32 Union Street, Randolph. Kindergarten- 
Primary Club 3, 4.; Elementary Vice-President 
4. Topics-of-Day Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Council Repre- 
sentative 2 ; Treasurer 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

She listens, naively, serious and credulous; 
then suddenly her saucy laugh leaves you won- 
dering just what she is thinking. 



ISABELLE MARENTZ 
19 Main Street, Quincy. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 



Self-assured and methodical, Isabelle works 
diligently and well. 




HELEN CATHERINE McGOVERN 

13 Charles Street, North Abington. Hobby 
Club 1. Library Club 4. Topics-of-Day Club 
1,2. W. A. A. 1,2,3, 4. 

Quiet? Yes, and prudent, too. Helen is 
always pleasant. 



ALPHA 



JOSEPH RUSSELL MclNNIS, JR. 

88 Waumbeck Street, Roxbury. Men's Club 
1,2,3,4. B. T. C. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Diligent Mac! He's always ready to laugh, 
no matter what you say to him; but still he goes 
around with a lasting, worried look. 



ANNA CATHERINE McKEE 

Main Street, Hingham. Campus Comment 
1, 2, 3, 4. Assistant Technical Editor 4. 
French Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Secretary 4. Hobby 
Club 1, 2; Treasurer Pro tern 2. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3,4. 

Dignified Anna is changeable from surface 
seriousness to gayness and light wit. 



MAE ELIZABETH MEDEIROS 

56 West Weir Street, Taunton. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Gypsy-like Mae frequently departs from us 
mortals to revel in colorful adventures of her 
imaginary world. 




a 1936 



THOMAS LARS MICHELSON 

Liberty Street, Sandwich. Men's Glee Club 
1 , 2, 3, 4. Men's Club 1 , 2, 3, 4. Alpha Ad- 
vertising Manager 4. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Assistant Director 2. Science Club 2. B. T. C. 
A. A. 1,2,3,4. 

Tommy is an able ref as we have found in 
class games. He must also be a plant-lover, for 
who but such a person would show so great a 
fondness for dogwood? 



EVELYN MARY MOITOZA 

56 Weir Street, Taunton. W. A. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4. 

It is well to be clever; to be forcefully so is 
Evelyn's honor. 




MURIEL LOUISE MOORE 

17 Garrison Avenue, West Somerville. Fresh- 
man Representative to Dormitory Council. Treas- 
urer of Dormitory Council 3. Vice-President of 
Dormitory Council 4. Hobby Club 1 . Library 
Club 3, 4. W. A. A. 1,2, 4. 

Demurely sweet, Moo is trim and domestic 
proficiency herself. 




FRANCIS MICHAEL MORAN 

66 Chandler Street, Holbrook. Men's Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3 ; Librarian 2, 3. Men's Club 1, 2, 
3, 4 ; President 4. Alpha 1, 4; Photographic 
Editor, 4. Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4,- Librarian 1, 2, 
3. B. T. C. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4,- Vice-President 4. 
Men's Club Representative S. C. A. 4. 

Although Mike has had many interests, he 
maintains his Wood-consciousness. His bat- 
tered passenger-carrier is evidence of his in- 
ability to become covered by insurance. 




GORDON JAMES MORRISON 

44 Simmons Avenue, Brockton. Men's Club 
1,2,3,4. Alpha Treasurer 4. B. T. C. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Speed should not be judged by the name. 
He is most popularly associated with smart 
clothes and a ready wit. Speed is more than 
capable if he wants to be. 



ALPHA 



MARION ELIZABETH MORSE 

139 Day Road, Canton. Girl Scouts 1, 2, 3. 
Hobby Club 2, 3. Topics-of-Day Club 4. W. 
A. A. 1, 2, 3,4. 

Marion is studious,- and, whatever she does, 
you may be sure that it will be practical. 



ELIZA CLAIRE MOURA 

52 Grinned Street, New Bedford. French 
Club 1,2. Girl Scouts 1. Glee Club 2, 3, 4; 
Vice-President 4. Kindergarten-Primary Club 2. 
Library Club 4. Division Representative 2. 
Chairman of Elections Committee 4. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3,4. 

Petite, but with extraordinary big dimples, 
Eliza remains quietly sparkling even in her fre- 
quent pensive moods. 



ELIZABETH MULLEN 

203 West Elm Street, Brockton. W. A. A. 4. 

Discreet, chic, of sporty appearance, she 
breezed in on us from Wellesley College. 




a 1 936 




MARY MAGDALEN MURRAY 

123 Blackstone Street, Fall River. Topics-of- 
Day Club 3, 4; Vice-President 4. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Mary's diplomacy is doubly effective because 
of her remarkably resonant, yet compelling 
voice. 



ALICE IRENE MURRILL 

615 Market Street, Rockland. Garden Club 
2, 3. Hobby Club 1. Topics-of-Day Club 
2,3,4. W. A. A. 1,2,4. 

Unobtrusive in her procedure, effectual in her 
results. 



MARSHALL WREN NAY 

127 Summer Street, Abington. Campus Com- 
ment 2, 3, 4. Men's Glee Club 3. Men's 
Club 1,2, 3,4. B.T. C. A. A. 1,2,3,4. 

Marsh is a jovial fellow, a magnificent pre- 
tender with potential abilities. Versatile — even 
to the point of turning "tourist" during spare 
periods. 




RAYMOND OTIS NICKERSON 

Bridge Road, Orleans. Men's Club 1, 2, 
3, 4. Science Club 2, 3; Vice-President 3. 
B. T. C. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Once Nick becomes interested in anything, 
his expenditure of energy to the accomplish- 
ment of an end knows no bounds. Specifically, 
extended weekly excursions Cape ward reveal an 
increasing interest in a particular Cape Lily. 




JOHN EDWARD NOLAN 

599 Main Street, Somerset. Men's Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 3. Class Represen- 
tative 1, 2, 3, 4. Alpha Assistant Business 
Manager 3. B. T. C. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Vice- 
President 3; President 4. 

Jack is the man who has made things tick at 
Bridgewater — good-natured, sincere, and al- 
ways willing to help the other fellow. Jack's 
room became the haven for many tired souls. 



DOROTHY ELIZABETH NORTON 

569 Tyler Street, Pittsfield. Secretary of 
Woodward 4. Glee Club 4. W. A. A. 1, 2, 
3. 4. 

Impish? Yes. Effervescent? Most decided- 
ly so. Humorous and cute. 



ALPHA 



WILLIAM ANTHONY NUGENT 

205 Franklin Street, Fall River. Men's Club 
1,2,3,4. B. T. C. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Bill, part of the Fall River combination in the 
print shop, is a neat addition to a tennis team — 
when he wants to be. Evasive? — That is no 
word for it, as you will agree if you remember 
his counter-questioning when stuck by pointed 
geo-problems. 



PAUL FRANCIS OLENICK 

17 Gaudette Avenue, Brockton. Men's Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. Orchestra 1, 2. B. T. C. A. A. 
1 , 2, 3, 4. 

Fun-loving Paul has majored in the investi- 
gations of embarrassing pranks. His excellence 
at basketball is due to his eat, sleep, and drink 
basketball policy. He spends his week-ends 
as a garage mechanic — perhaps he's trying to 
repair Morrison's omnibus. 




* 1 9 36 




ALICE NANCY ORDWAY 

9 Francis Street, Groveland. Garden Club 
1. W. A. A. 1,4. 

Everything about Nancy is orderly; quaint is 
the impression she makes. 



MARY ELIZABETH OSBORNE 

R. F. D. Rockland. Campus Comment 1, 2, 
3, 4; Assistant Copy Editor 4. French Club 
2, 3, 4 ; Reporter 4. Hobby Club 1 , 2. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Insouciant, a dreamer, philosophical Mary is 
prone to argument. 



SYLVIA ANNE PENTIKAINEN 




Carver. 
Editor 4. 
1,2,4. 



Campus Comment 2, 3, 4,- Exchange 
Class Representative 1. W. A. A. 



Sylvia is intellectual, wisely non-committal, 
and invariably enthusiastic about tackling a new 
problem. 



EUNICE NOYES PERKINS 

1 3 Parsons Street, Newburyport. Vice-Presi- 
dent of Woodward 4. Lecture Fund Com- 
mittee 2. Kindergarten-Primary Club 2. Li- 
brary Club 2, 3, 4 ; Secretary 3. W. A. A. 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Striking, hospitable, and refined — Eunice is 
the picture of loveliness. 




HENRY JOSEPH PLAUSSE 



ALPHA 



72 Blake Street, Whitman. 
Men's Club 4. 



B. T. C. A. A. 4. 



Henry, the rugged boy from B. C. and also 
coach of Whitman Town Team, is always able to 
give a plausable explanation of the com- 
plicated scientific experiments in general science 
class. He's the most popular man in school — 
immediately after a sociology exam. 



VIRGINIA STAPLES PRARIO 

Highland Road, Marshfield Hills. Girl Scouts 
1,2,3; Treasurer 2/ Vice-President 3. Science 
Club 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

Ginnie is tailored and immaculate — genteel 
in bearing. 



FLORENCE CAROLINE PRATT 

33 Central Street, Whitman. Glee Club 3, 4. 
W. A. A. 2, 4. 

Fair Flossie is ever delicately feminine. The 
face that launched a thousand ships. 



FLORENCE ELIZABETH QUIGLEY 

24 West Weir Street, Taunton. Hobby Club 
1 . Topics-of-Day Club 1 , 2. W. A. A. 1 , 2, 4. 

Crisp and stately, yet extremely effervescent, 
Flo seems always to be enjoying life tremendous- 

ly. 







a 1936 




CATHERINE MARY REILLY 

448 Salem Street, Rockland. Topics-of-Day 
Club 1,2, 3,4. W. A. A. 1,2, 4. 

Inaccessible she stands; although a dreamer, 
she consistently does the practical thing. 



ERNESTINE WALKER REYNOLDS 

41 Columbus Avenue, Northampton. Class 
Representative 2, 3. Girl Scouts 1, 2,- Vice- 
President 2. Kindergarten-Primary Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Vice-President 3; President 4. Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Pensively aloof at times, Ernie is quietly 
gracious. 



ELLEN EUGENIA RICHWAGEN 

60 Rosemary Street, Needham. Campus 
Comment 2. German Club 3, 4. Kinder- 
garten-Primary Club 3, 4; Vice-President of Pri- 
mary Group 4. Library Club 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Thoughtful of others, earnest in all her efforts, 
loyal to high ideals. 




SAMUEL GEORGE RILEY 

110 West Britannia Street, Taunton. Men's 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. B. T. C. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Class Representative 4. 

Socially- and family-minded Sam! We all 
got a kick out of the rapid-fire speech, the ar- 
gumentativeness, and things like that charac- 
teristic of this long-unlicensed chevy-pilot. 




KATHRYN MURIEL ROSS 

Edgewood Street, Gloucester. Campus Com- 
ment 1, 2. Secretary of Lecture Fund 3. Lib- 
rary Club 1, 2, 3, 4; President 4. Alpha 1. 
Topics-of-Day Club 1,4. W. A. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4. 

What she does she does well when she con- 
siders it worth doing. Kit's humor is inter- 
mingled with serious philosophy. 



HOWARD WAYNE ROUNSEVILLE 

141 South Main Street, Attleboro. Men's 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. B. T. C. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Present Arms! This is "Red," the fiery man 
who has a weakness for bewildered Freshman 
girls. Argumentative yet exacting. Red as- 
pires to be Bridgewater's gift to the United 
States Army — after he has graduated from his 
correspondence courses. 



HELEN ISABEL RUSSELL 

67 Edison Park, Quincy. Treasurer of S. C. 
A. 4. Division Representative 3. Orchestra 1 , 2, 
3,4. Topics-of-Day Club 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Unfeigned and steadfast, Helen is adept and 
business-like. 



ALPHA 



JOHN RYAN 

56 Park Street, Rockland. 
B. T. C. A. A. 4. 



Men's Club 4. 



Johnny's gregarious nature and likable 
character have accomplished much in making 
him a Bridgewater Man in one year — more so 
than many become in four years. When the 
"woods" are becoming "green" we will re- 
member him. 




— 



a 1 936 




MARY TYYNE SALO 

17 Ethel Avenue, Peabody. Glee Club 1, 

2, 3, 4; Secretary 3; President 4. Library Club 

3, 4. Alpha 3; Assistant Literary Editor. 
W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Mary remains undaunted by the pressure of 
circumstances, — she is deliberate, unhurried in 
her speech. 



MARGARET DOROTHY SAVAGE 

80 Graham Street, Quincy. Topics-of-Day 
Club 4. W. A. A. 2, 3, 4. 

Merrily loquacious and excitable, Dot has an 
exuberant personality. 



ALTHEA PEENE SAWYER 

293 East Squantum Street, Atlantic. Glee 
Club 3, 4. W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

Decidedly distinctive in appearance, de- 
cided in manner, Althea possesses the per- 
sistency that makes for success. 



RITA IRMA SAWYER 

2 Winthrop Street, Taunton. Freshman Class 
Representative. Camera Club 3, 4; Presi- 
dent 4. German Club 3; President. Topics-of- 
Day Club 3. W. A. A. 1,2,3,4. 

Practical and radical, individual in all that 
she represents, Rita has been an enterprising and 
energetic worker in our class. 





BARBARA JOSEPHINE SCHMALTZ 

177 Colburn Street, East Dedham. Dramatic 
Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-President 3 and 4. Library 
Club 1. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 4. 

Barb is piquant, poised yet languid, and 
adroitly discerning. 



ALPHA 



FLORENCE ARNOLD SELLERS 

Murdock Street, Middleboro. W. A. A. 3, 4. 

Seriously intent, she remains exclusive, dra- 
matic in all she does. 



FRANCES SHATZ 

33 Lowe Street, Quincy. Topics-of-Day Club 
1, 2, 3. W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Stately in demeanor and firm; sober in thought, 
yet lofty. 



HENRY SHAW 

North Carver. Men's Club 4. B.T.C.A.A.4. 

This taciturn person daily comes from the wilds 
of North Carver. Here we see only the scholarly 
side of his personality, but still water runs deep. 







^1936 




BARBARA SMITH 

123 Mt. Pleasant Avenue, Gloucester. Vice- 
President of Tillinghast Hall 3; President 4. 
Campus Comment 1, 2, 3,- Assistant Editor 3. 
Garden Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Treasurer 3. Girl 
Scouts 1. Topics-of-DayClub1. W. A. A. 1,4. 

Barb is proficient and reliable — optimistically 
loquacious. 



HARRISON SMITH 

276 Sandwich Street, Plymouth. B. T. C. A. A. 
4. Glee Club 4. Men's Club 4. 

Good-natured, carefree Harry was Harvard's 
gift to a successful soccer team; and after making 
a name for himself in that sport, he continued 
starring by giving brilliant performances in the 
gym. He was envied by all for the ownership 
of the nicest looking coupe in school. 



MIRIAM SNOW 

207 Couch Street, Taunton. French Club 4. 
W. A. A. 4. 

Constantly alert, judicious, desirous of pleas- 
ing, Bunny became quickly adapted to Bridge- 
water from Pembroke. 



SADYE STEIN 

61 Verchild Street, Quincy. Topics-of-Day 
Club 2. W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Responsive to every challenge life offers her, 
she is sagacious in turmoil. 





ANNE SURINSKI 

252 South Street, Bridgewater. Dramatic 
Club 4. Glee Club 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Of frolicsome and gay nature, Anne is eager 
and compliant. 



ALPHA 



JOSEPH PETER SZEMATOWICZ 

75 Platts Street, North Abington. Men's 
Club 1,2, 3, 4. B. T. C. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

Szem was endowed with a most extraordinary 
memory — encyclopedic, as it were. But don't 
get the wrong impression. Joe's practical 
pranks of D5 were the source of much fun. 



EMANUEL TAITZ 

54 Holworthy Street, Roxbury. Camera Club 
4. Men's Glee Club 2, 3, 4. Men's Club 
1, 2, 3, 4. Science Club 2, 3, 4; Vice-Presi- 
dent 4. B. T. C. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

Manny's brilliance is not shown by the dili- 
gence with which he attacks outside work, but 
by the quiet outbursts of his scientific reasoning. 



ESTHER HARRIET THORLEY 

Circuit Street, West Hanover. Orchestra 
1, 2, 3; Secretary 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Recording Secretary 4. 

Charming and graceful, Bunny has an engag- 
ing manner and a delightful smile. 




1936 



MARY ELIZABETH TIERNEY 

45 Dover Street, Worcester. Class Repre- 
sentative 1, 2. S. C. A. 1, 2. Kindergarten- 
Primary Club 1 , 2, 3, 4. W. A. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4. 

Constantly placid, retiring, mystical, known to 
all, yet unknown. 




JOHN EDWARD TRUE 

16 Ashland Avenue, Southbridge. Men's 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4. Alpha Business Manager 4. 
Science Club 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 4. B. T. C. A. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Jack is the college mail carrier who divines 
that "service with a smile" pays good divi- 
dends. Industrious, and possessing a scientific 
mind with biological leanings, Jack is a con- 
noisseur in the art of dissecting frogs, dogfish, 
and the like. 



DOROTHY SUTHERLAND TURNER 

452 Titicut Street, State Farm. Orchestra 4. 
W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Exuberant in a quiet way, Dot shows grace 
and charm in every motion. 




ELIZABETH WASSERMAN 



23 Fabian Street, Dorchester. 
W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 



Library Club 1. 



Striking and individual in appearance, yet 
reticent, she daily changes her style and the 
results are interestingly modern. 




RUTH DIXON TURNER 

163 Forest Street, Melrose. Orchestra 1, 2, 
3, 4. Science Club 2, 3, 4. Topics-of-Day 
Club 2, 3, 4; Secretary 4. W. A. A. 1 , 4. 

She is conscientious and considerate, and re- 
calls to mind a comely cameo. 



ALPHA 



ISABELLE DELIA WALSH 

116 Laureston Street, Brockton. Alpha 2. 
Topics-of-Day Club 2, 4. French Club 3, 4. 
W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Gracious, regal, taciturn — Isabelle — diligent 
and successful. 



CHARLES LINCOLN WHITCOMB 

P. O. Box 6, Merrimacport. Men's Club 
1,2,3,4. Science Club 2, 3. B. T. C. A. A. 
1, 2, 3,4. 

Whit is the favorite prankster of the senior 
class. If there is any trick to be played on some 
unsuspecting subject, Whit is the one to do it. 
His genius is shown in every subject — espe- 
cially science, where he does his best work in 
spoiling other people's experiments. 




« 19 36 



JOSEPHINE FRANCES STURTEVANT 

25 Union Avenue, East Weymouth. Hobby 
Club 1,2. W. A. A. 1,2, 3,4. 

Jo, adventurous and undaunted, flaring at 
times, and ever buoyant. 



EVELYN FRANCES WHITTY 

11 Everett Street, Middleboro. W. A. A. 
1,2,3,4. 

Eve is always obliging, energetic in every- 
thing, and is particularly enthusiastic over sports. 




THELMA HELENE WOLFSON 

358 Broadway, Chicopee Falls. Campus 
Comment 1, 2, 3, 4; Copy Editor 3; Manag- 
ing Editor 4. Girl Scouts 1. Glee Club 2, 3, 
4. Hobby Club 1,2. W. A. A. 1,2, 3, 4. 

Unconcerned and aloof. Tommy is hard to 
know but has much to offer. 




1 936 
ALPHA 



JUNIORS 

President James Peebles 

Vice-President Katherine Donahue 

Secretary Nellie Beaton 

Treasurer Mary Bartley 



History 

Junior days seem to be the acme of all that college years can mean — days per- 
meated with a delight for living, holding none of the bewildered feeling of the Fresh- 
man, the unsettled state of the Sophomore, or the sorrow of the Senior. We cease 
to be observers and boldly sail forth on a life of activity as upper classmen — feeling 
ourselves fully established as a part of the college. 

The new plan of Senior training affected us, giving us a term longer to be together 
as Juniors to apply the lessons learned in Training School in preparation for better 
teaching as Seniors. Meanwhile the Juniors have not failed to inscribe their names 
on athletic records and contribute their share to the social season. Our boys have 
supported all our varsity teams, while W. A. A. honor teams have the names of 
several Junior girls. The Ice Carnival, ushered in on a snappy December night, was 
the same big success as '37's previous socials. The gala event of the season, however, 
was the colorful Sophomore-Junior prom. 

Then, too, Junior musical talent has helped to make many school affairs through- 
out the season successful events. As the year draws to a close, we look backward on 
a year of accomplishments and forward to a year of greater achievement and fellow- 
ship at B. T. C. before we go forth "to minister." 

Nellie Beaton, Secretary 



GRADUATING 
JUNIORS 




ELMIRA DELANO BEATON 

WestWareham. Glee Club 1,2, 3. W. A. A. 
1, 2, 3. 

Quaint and efficient best describe Elmira — 
one or Miss Rand's stars. 



KATHERINE BRANLEY 

243 Hancock Street, South Braintree. W. A. A. 
1,2,3. 

In every sport Kay is a star,- but few people 
have heard her at the organ. Her pupils will 
have "Ryhthm in Their Nursery Rhymes" — and 
why not? 



VIRGINIA BLANCHE CHASE 

Monument Beach, Bourne. Glee Club 2, 3. 
Kindergarten-Primary Club 2. W. A. A. 3. 

Virginia is a witty pal and can be relied upon 
to relieve a tense situation with her Joe Penner 
exhibition. 




RUTH HILDA GAFFNEY 

115 Winthrop Street, Taunton. Hobby Club 
1, 2. Library Club 1. Topics-of-Day Club 3. 
W. A. A. 1,2,3. 

With her flashing blue eyes and shining black 
hair Hilda is a typical Irish colleen. She is 
quietly pleasant and reliable. 




MARJORIE ELLA HOWLAND 

1 8 Cottage Street, Elmwood. W. A. A. 3. 

Very quiet and serene is Marjorie, but she 
also possesses a dry humor which makes her a 
good companion. 



GRADUATING 



CAROLINE FRANCES LINDBERG 



Monument Beach, Bourne. 
Kindergarten-Primary Club 2. 
3. 



Glee Club 2, 3. 
W. A. A. 1, 2 



Caroline is a conscientious worker with a fiery 
temperament that matches her beautiful red 
hair. 



EVELYN FARIS MacCOMBIE 

98 Lincoln Street, Stoughton. W. A. A. 3. 

During her three years at Bridgewater, Evelyn 
has been Miss Pope's able office assistant. In 
this, as in all her work, she has shown outstand- 
ing efficiency. 



MARY MADRUGA 

545 Privet Street, New Bedford. W. A. A. 3. 

Even though Mary has been with us only 
a year she has made many friends because of 
her enthusiastic, interesting manner. 




JUNIORS 



CORNELIA SULLIVAN 

20 Pond Street, South Braintree. Class Repre- 
sentative 2, 3. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3; Vice-Presi- 
dent 3. 

Connie is a combination of "pep, vim, and 
vigor." Be it school work, club work, or sports, 
she is always a leader. 



PAULINE RUTH SYLVIA 

Locust Street, Falmouth. W. A. A. 1, 2, 3. 

Polly's lively, carefree manner make her a 
grand girl. Caroline and she will miss the 
walks they took at three-thirty — just for the 




CHARLOTTE STEVENS 

2575 Washington Street, Canton. W. A. A. 3. 

Charlotte came to us in our sophomore year 
from St. Lawrence University. Poise and re- 
serve are characteristic of her. 




EUNICE WARNER 

1 34 Roosevelt Street, Weymouth. 

"Beautiful but brilliant," that's Eunie. She is 
certainly "Cleopatra" in her charms — luring all 
the dates to fall behind her titian tresses. 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

BACCALAUREATE June 7, 1936 

Dr. Zenos E. Scott Speaker 
PROMENADE June, 8, 1936 

General Chairman — John Ryan 
Hall— Rita Cassidy 
Music — John Nolan 
Favors — Cornelia Sullivan 
Hospitality — Doris Kelliher, Barbara Albret 
Refreshments — Ruth Cronin 
Invitations — Barbara Greenwood 

Parker House 
Jack Marchard's Orchestra 

CLASS PICNIC June 9, 1936 

General Chairman — Margaret Gilliat 

FACULTY RECEPTION June 11, 1936 

CLASS DAY June 12, 1936 

General Chairman — Rita Sawyer 
Chinese Scene — Ida Leino 
Hebrew Scene — Belle Barsky 
Russian Scene — Carol Lindberg 
German Scene — Alice Larsen, Ruth Flaherty 
English Scene — Doris Jones 
American Scene — Gertrude French 

GRADUATION June 12, 1936 

Address by Charles Swain Thomas, Professor of English, Harvard University 
Class gift — $100 for the Katherine Chipman Boyden Scholarship Fund 

IVY MARCH June 12, 1936 

General Chairman, Ruth Davis 

Significance of the Ivy March 

The trumpet calls represent the call to duty, especially for the Seniors. 

The oak boughs held by the under-classmen symbolize to the Seniors the ever- 
lasting protection of the College. 

The ivy, which is planted and also carried by each graduate, symbolizes the spirit 
of comradeship and good fellowship. 

The daisy chain carried by the Junior women represents a guard of honor for the 
Seniors. 

Finally, the "Alma Mater" sung by the Seniors at the conclusion of the March 
signifies a continual renewal of their loyalty to Bridgewater. 



r '■', Hm 



>r 



1 M 




■ : 



£ !!«&<* •• 



mill 



uSM. i£: 




n 



ill 

^ A' < £- 



■'7- 



jJBJlBKii 






IfOIll- 








»Bg*g£: 


HSW 






"■' ;.f* ,<r 




fefe 


/ 



Cr 



ft il 



Junior Class Roll 
Candidates for Degree, 1937 



Agnetta, Frederic 469 Adams St., Ajhmont 

Allen, Elizabeth 3 Waban St., Wellesley 

Alpert, Leo 96 Waumbeclc St., Roxbury 

Anderson, Anna 201 Howard St., West Bridgewater 

Bartell, Madeline .19 Day St., Norwood 

Bartley, Mary Sandwich 

Beaton, Nellie 80 Lakewood Rd., South Weymouth 

Beck, Thelma 49 Dudley St., New Bedford 

Bell, Carolyn 1 Normal St., Worcester 

Blanchfield. Alice 13 Holyoke St., Easthampton 

Bodwell, Verne 37 Covington St., Bridgewater 

Bowles, Edward 287 Reed St., Rockland 

Bradford, Richard Winthrop St., Kingston 

Brough, Frances 34 Adams St., Fall River 

Brown, Avis Congress Ave., Amesbury 

Buckley, Margaret 21 Kensington Place, Brockton 

Butterfield, Marjorie 112 Fremont St., Lowell 

Calen, Ruth 312 Pond St., South Weymouth 

Callery, Margaret Main St., Bridgewater 

Candy, Marjorie 35 Lakewood Rd., South Weymouth 

Cashin, Shirley 43 Locust St., Brockton 

Cassels, Helen 24 Jay St., North Attleboro 

Cassidy, Marjorie 21 Wood St., Plymouth 

Chambers, Marion 168 Wilson Ave., Wollaston 

Cleary, Lillian 18 Quincy Ave., East Braintree 

Clifford, Nelson 42 Ruggles St., Quincy 

Cobb, Marjorie 52 Thurber Ave., Brockton 

Cochrane, Virginia 158 Belmont St., Wollaston 

Colby, Phyllis Birch Meadow, Merrimac 

Collins, Louise 231 River Rd., New Bedford 



n 




4* W ^r & 





«&& 



Junior Class Roll 
Candidates for Degree, 1937 

Conley, Elizabeth 1 36 Middleboro Ave., East Taunton 

Conley, Louise 50 Erin St., Whitman 

Connell, Madeline 18 Hi Merest Rd. East Weymouth 

Cosgrove, Gail 28 Lewis St., Lynn 

Dacko, Helen 82 Radcliffe Rd., Mattapan 

Donahue, Katherine 28 Palmer St.. Somerset 

Ehrhardt, Theodore 8 Stetson St., Whitman 

Eldridge, Louise 47 Highland Rd., West Somerville 

Farley, Rita 4 Myrtle St., Pittsfield 

Ferguson, Florence 16 Everett St., Rockland 

Fiske, Edith 10 Leonard St., Pittsfield 

French, Dorothy 37 South Ave., Melrose 

Fuller, Marion 58 Royal St., Wollaston 

Gallipeau, Marion 78 Pleasant St., Mansfield 

Gillis, Florence 61 Sycamore Ave., Brockton 

Godsill, Catherine 41 Grove Ave., Brockton 

Grant, Eileen 1 350 North Main St., Fall River 

Gricius, Prakseda 31 Goodwin St., Bridgewater 

Hall, Dorothy 149 Washington St., Whitman 

Hall, Eleanor 1 22 Cambridge St. . Fall River 

Hatchfield, Muriel 23 Spooner Ave., North Easton 

Hayden, Christie 1 097 South Franklin St. . Brookville 

Hinckley, James 427 Randolph St., North Abington 

Holmes, Daniel 24 Leonard St., Bridgewater 

Horton, James 18 Orchard St., Taunton 

Houghton, Dorothea 222 West Main St., Avon 

Imhof, Rosamond 57 Central St., Abington 

Jackson, Robert 101 Sycamore Ave., Brockton 

James, Edith 26 Elm St., Hingham 

Jarusik, Helen 110 County St., New Bedford 

Julin, John 1 39 Cliffe Ave., Lexington 

Kavanaugh, Lucile 43 Snell St., Brockton 

Kelleher, Virginia Oak St., Brockton 



1936 
ALPHA 

Kelly, Helen Sprague Ave., Holbrook 

Kiernan, Vincent 34 Short St., Randolph 

Kimball, Beatrice 35 Keene St., Brockton 

Kurtzman, Rose 1 34 Main St., Quincy 

LaBelle, Quentin 64 East St., Avon 

Lane, Agnes Grandview, Natick 

Leonard, George 38 Hancock St., Abington 

Levow, Esther 1 02 Rotch St., New Bedford 

Lincoln, Doris Morrison Rd., Wakefield 

Long, Girard 47 Highland Ter., Brockton 

Lucey, Virginia 187 Boylston St., Brockton 

Lupica, Maiion 898 South Montello St., Brockton 

MacDonnell, Jane 1 6 Stratford Rd., North Weymouth 

Macy, Bernigold 121 Cottage St., Fall River 

Martini, Olga 411 Broadway, Somerville 

McDougall, Irving 3 New Heath St., Roxbury 

Medvetz, Charles 484 Plymouth St., Abington 

Metcalf, Ruth 450 Plymouth St., Bridgewater 

Moye, Ralph 94 Broadway, Raynham 

Nardozzi, Lean 419 Pleasant St., Stoughton 

Nelson, Mary 234 North Elm St., West Bridgewater 

Nelson, Ralph 16 Cushing St., Waltham 

Newbury, Thomas 337 London St., Fall River 

O'Sullivan, Nona 340 West St., Randolph 

Palmisano, Anna 39 Summer St., Quincy 

Parsons, Gordon 143 Aquidneck St., New Bedford 

Partridge, James 207 Buffington St., Fall River 

Pearson, Helen 348 Wareham St., Middleboro 

Peebles, James Monument Beach 

Penley, Frances 1 74 Birch St., Bridgewater 

Pitcher, Damon 81 Newberry St., Brockton 

Place, Jessie 114 River St., Middleboro 

Plaza, Jennie 284 Earle St., New Bedford 

Puro, Alii 395 Water St., Quincy 

Quinn, Wilmer 65 Brown Ave., Holyoke 

Randall. Marie 293 School St., Whitman 

Regan, William 1 Canton St., North Easton 

Reidy, Mary 1 200 Pleasant St., East Weymouth 

Rigby, Joan 23 Berry St., Quincy 

Robak, Laura 73 Nelson St., New Bedford 

Roberts, Phyllis 1 55 Park Ave., Arlington 

Robertson, Helen 305 Neponset Ave., Norwood 

Robinson, Harriet Robinson Rd., Littleton 

Schapelle, Donald 235 Union Ave., Rockland 

Shaff, Anna 21 Washington St., Taunton 

Shaw, Marion 25 Hill Crest Ave., Brockton 

Sisson, Eleanor . 391 5 Acushnet Ave., New Bedford 

Smith, Jeanette 34 Troy St., Brockton 

Spanick, Wanda Riverside Ave., Pottersville 

Stetson, Thomas 64 Center St., East Weymouth 

Stewart, Ralph 93 Webb St., Weymouth 

Swartz, Philip 1 7 Schuyler St., Roxbury 

Thompson, Doris South St., Bedford 

Tupper, Eleanor 48 Chapel St., Abington 

Tysver, lone Rear, 1 Marble St., Gloucester 

von Bergen, Marie 44 Hillside Ave., Wollaston 

Westerling, Thelma 44 Harvard St., Quincy 

Westgate, Lawrence Miller St., Rock 

Weygand, Alma 46 Avon St., Taunton 

Whitney, Marjorie 75 Day St., Norwood 

Wilbur, Bernice 901 North Main St., Randolph 

Wilbur, Philip R.F.D. No. 2, Middleboro 

Zeoli, Richard 294 Middle St., East Weymouth 



19 36 
CLASSES 



SOPHOMORES 

President George Johnston 

Vice-President Dorothy Perkins 

Secretary Eleanor Campbell 

Treasurer Shirley Dutton 



History 

After a summer of recuperation from our strenuous and exciting Freshman year, 
we gladly returned once again to B. T. C. ready to begin our second year with a 
slight suggestion of dignity. Dignity, however, doesn't accompany Freshman ini- 
tiations. We joyfully took our turn acclimating the Freshmen to college life, as do 
all Sophomores. 

When the Freshmen were acquainted with their surroundings we then turned 
toward our social activities. The Sophomore-social was held in January, immed- 
iately following the Christmas vacation. 

The Sophomores boast some excellent athletes, both male and female. In every 
sport the Sophomore class was represented on the varsity team. 

We were the first Sophomores not to carry out the tradition of gaining our first 
teaching experience in the Training School during our Sophomore year. We look 
forward hopefully, but sceptically, to our training next year. 

As June rolls around we have completed another very happy year at B. T. C. 
and we are looking forward to our return as the so-called "complacent" juniors. 

Eleanor Campbell, Secretary 





;!K-,f',i 



0% n 



M mm $% Am 



Sophomore Class Roll 



Barton, Beatrice 8 Hamilton St., Wollaston 

Bazinet, Ernest 15 Schorield Ave., Dudley 

Bell, Dorothy 173 Spring St., Brockton 

Biller, Milton 37 Lancester St., Quincy 

Blake, Eleanor . 34 Linden St., Fall River 

Borgatti, Magda 75 High St., Bridgewater 

Bromley, Marie Bridgewater 

Bump, Benjamin 26 Courtland St., Middleboro 

Cadwell, Emma 42 Summer St., Kingston 

Campbell, Eleanor 42 Church St., Bridgewater 

Carlson, Margaret 105 Plympton St., Middleboro 

Carroll, Rita 65 Norton Ave., Taunton 

Chadwick, Virginia 51 Francis Ave., West Bridgewater 

Chassey, Viola 64 Grove St., Bridgewater 

Chicetti, Joseph 12 Perkins St., Bridgewater 

Cleary, Margery 108 Phillips St., Wollaston 

Cleaves, Barbara 77 Evans St., North Weymouth 

Clegg, Elizabeth Fall River Ave. Seekonk 

Cohen, Leo 16 Balfour St., Roxbury 

Conneil, Mary 44 Iron Hill St., East Weymouth 

Costello, Margaret 10 Hanna St., Quincy 

Courant, Genevieve 56 Washington St., Gloucester 

Cowgill, Ethel Box 81 8, Onset, Mass. 

Creney. Eileen 462 Summer St., Brockton 

Go well, Geraldine 260 Hingham St., Rockland 

Cushman, Dorothy 37 Hale St., Bridgewater 

Cushman, Milo, Jr Wyben Ter., Westfield 

Deane, Margaret 462 Summer St., Bridgewater 

Dennison, Doris 43 Quincy Ave., Quincy 

Dix, Elizabeth 32 Sycamore Ave., Brockton 

Donahoe, Mary 217 Commercial St., Weymouth 

Donovan, Rita 19 Beal St., North Weymouth 

Dutton, Shirley 10 Alvin Rd., Plymouth 

Dwyer, Richard Basket St., Huntington 

Flaherty, Kathryn 30 Tapley St., Lynn 

Fleish, Sylvia Gammons Rd., Acushnet 






Sophomore Class Roll 



Foley, Grace 35 Plain St., Randolph 

Francis, Marilyn 38 County Rd., Chelsea 

Gardner, Claire 37 Beebe Rd., Bridgewater 

Gaudette, Wilder High St., Norwell 

Gauszis, Mary . . 46 Upland Rd., Brockton 

Gavitt, Katherine 73 Main St., Williamstown 

Goldstein, Mildred 899 Robeson St., Fall River 

Gould, Marion West Wareham 

Graham, Kathleen Benson St., South Middleboro 

Gurney, Elizabeth 349 Cottage St., New Bedford 

Hanlon, Lawrence 211 Copeland St., Quincy 

Hartford, Marjorie 646 Essex Ave., Gloucester 

Harlow, Eleanor 106Qcean Ss., Marshfield 

Hepperle, Anna 75 Marshall St., Braintree 

Hull, Polly 4 Abbott Rd., Gloucester 

Jagello, Francis 4 Dawes St., Dorchester 

Jenkins, Isabel Palmer Ave., Falmouth 

Johnston, George 21 8 Atlantic St., Atlantic 

Kelly, Kathleen 80 Rochelle St., Springfield 

King, Gertrude Box 207, Haydenville 

Kirby, Dorothy 100 Ridge St., Fall River 

Kispert, Moira 69 Herman St., Fall River 

Knuttunen, Sylvia 52 Buckley St., Quincy 

Koskela, Edward .— .... Sagamore 

Kuchmeister, Florence 15 Willow Ave., Winthrop 

Kundiz, Violet 35 Herrod Ave., Brockton 

Leonard, Ardelle 41 Court St., Brockton 

Lindsay, Josephine 1 348 Main St., South Weymouth 

Lipman, Dorothy 138 Myrtle St., New Bedford 

Logan, Helena 540 Columbian St., South Weymouth 

Martin, Jeannette 1 Warren Ave., Plymouth 

Masterson, Mary 1 State St., Taunton 

Mathews, Edward 35 Summer St., Weymouth 

McCarthy, Justin 18 Hamilton St., Brockton 

McDonough, Eileen 28 North Ave., Norwood 

McGloin, Margaret 592 Washington St., Braintree 



19 36 
ALPHA 



McGovern, John 13 Charles St., North Abington 

Metcalf, Mary 450 Plymouth St., Bridgewater 

Moore, Marjorie 99 Mt. Prospect St., Bridgewater 

Morgan, Phyllis 896 Allen St., Springfield 

Moulson, Dorcas 1 24 West St., Ware 

Moynan, Dorothy 13 Everett St., Taunton 

Murphy, Rita 36 Lincoln St., North Weymouth 

Nash, Malcolm 81 Chapel St., Abjngton 

Newsome, Wilma 14 James Rd., Weymouth Heights 

Nolan, William . 60 Sagamore, St., Dorchester 

Nye, Alma 23 Pearl St., Middleboro 

O'Brien, Anna 312 Franklin St., Quincy 

Oram, Alice 45 Kenneth St., West Roxbury 

Paul, Jeannette 77 Perry Ave., Whitman 

Perkins, Dorothy 133 Court St., Plymouth 

Perry, Amy 224 Hawthorne St., New Bedford 

Polsey, Barbara 1 70 Union St., Attleboro 

Powell, Margery 54 Fuller St., Middleboro 

Radio, Lucille 18 Schuyler St., Roxbury 

Rapaport, Jacob 18 Crowell St., Dorchester 

Raymond, Elizabeth 91 Kiver St., West Bridgewater 

Reynolds, Martha 51 Holmes St., North Quincy 

Riordan, Mary . . . . ' 155 Newbury St., Brockton 

Roberti, Ada Tupper Rd., Sandwich 

Rudd, Marie 200 W. Springfield St., Boston 

Russell, Marjory 30 Keith Place, East Bridgewater 

Ryan, Albert 56 Park St., Rockland 

Rymut, Bronia Furnace St., Halifax 

Sandlovitz, Helen 15 Grafton St., Quincy 

Shaw, Lillian 40 Hussey St., New Bedford 

Sherman, Dorothy Turnpike St., Eastondale 

Sherman, June 261 Titicut St., State Farm 

Skahill, Edward 5 Everett St., Wellesley 

Skerston, Olga 303 Summer St., Bridgewater 

Smith, John 83 Nelson St., Dorchester 

Smith, Margaret Buzzards Bay 

Southworth, Elizabeth Plymouth St., Bridgewater 

Sparkes, Alice 3 Grant St., Taunton 

Spillane, Catherine 71 Marietta Ave., Braintree 

Sullivan, Anna 32 Maple St., Randolph 

Sullivan, Lillian, 34 Richie Rd., Quincy 

Sullivan, Mary 33 South Walker St., Lowell 

Sullivan, Ruth 55 Bigelow St., Fall River 

Thomas, Gladys Plain St., North Easton 

Vanelli, Elaine 26 High St.. Quincy 

Vestburg, Dorothy 29 Common St., Weymouth 

Viner, Virginia 18 Nilsen Ave., Quincy 

Vollmer, Carol Curtjs Ave., Scituate 

Warren, Thomas State Farm 

Waters, Doris 102 Seaver St., Roxbury 

Webber, Helen Oak Hill Rd., Rutland 

Wehter, Anne 21 Garfield St., Quincy 

Weldon, Althea 41 Columbia St., Watertown 

Whittemore, Dorothy 50 Phillips St., Wollaston 

Wintermeyer, Charles 4 Walker St., Weymouth 

Witherell, Charles South Weymouth 

Wynot, Rowena 17 Clark St., Braintree 

Zubrzycki, Victor 30 Sanger St., Bridgewater 



1936 
CLASSES 



FRESHMEN 

President Gerald Connor 

Vice-President Priscilla Eisenhaure 

Secretary William McGhee 

Treasurer Eleanor Savaria 



History 

If any of us entertained any ideas of being important, they were quickly evapo- 
rated when we were taken in hand by the upper-classmen at the opening of the college 
year. The initiation was a success from all points of view,- both the initiators and the 
initiated proved themselves good sports. 

The Acquaintance Social afforded us an opportunity to become acquainted 
with our fellow students. 

A Freshman Tea was held during Book Week in the library. The girls were well 
represented and even a few of the men were prevailed upon to attend. 

The Freshman Party held in the Albert Gardner Boyden gymnasium uncovered 
a wealth of talent in the class. 

At the Freshman Social in May, further opportunity was provided to meet class- 
mates and enjoy an evening of dancing. 

The sports world found the class contributing their share of material to the teams. 

We have begun our college careers well. May we continue to grow, and by 
our actions demonstrate to the world that Bridgewater Teachers College is one of the 
best of its kind! 

William R. McGhee, Secretary. 




m " m m 



*>■<«, , 






Freshmen Class Roll 



Albertini, Albert . 20 Prince St., Plymouth 

Allen, Anne 4666 North Main St., Fall River 

Allan, Barbara 533 Chestnut St., Needham 

' ndrews, Louise 105 Graham St., Quincy 

Augustine, John . 244 South St., Bridgewater 

Austin, Jane 33 Weber St., Springfield 

Bailey, Frank 9 Sawyer St., Wareham 

Barchi, Rita 64 Ledge Road, Seekonk 

Bardini, Mary East Wareham 

Barnes, Marion 35 Jefferson St., Taunton 

Barrett, Mary 15 Carter Road, South Braintree 

"artington, Betty Tilden Road, Scituate 

Barton, Amy 41 3 Brown St., Attleboro 

Behan, Geraldine 95 Pleasant St., Holbrook 

Bentley, Marjorie 20 Keith St., Weymouth 

Bertoli, Lillian 66 Madison Ave., Quincy 

.^Bigelow, Lloyd 299 Manning St., Needham 

^ Black, Virginia 50 Willow St., Wollaston 

Blaney, Robert Front St.. Marion 

Bongarzone, Elito 76 Madison St., East Weymouth 

Boyd, Gertrude 6 Glenwood Way, Quincy 

Boyle, Dorothy Chestnut St., Hatfield 

Bragg, Meredith 112 Randolph St., South Weymouth 

Brine, Elizabeth 73 Prospect St., West Newton 

Burnett, John 58 Simpson Ave., Somerville 

Butterfield, Esther 1 12 Fremont St., Lowell 

Campbell, Helen 30 Harbor Villa Ave., East Braintree 

aspersen, C. Carlotta 268 Plymouth St., Holbrook 

Chaput, Marjorie 20 Ninth Ave., Haverhill 

Cheetham, Dorothy Brayton Ave., Somerset 

Chisholm, Mary 18 Guild St., Quincy 

Church, Elsie 1 341 Washington St., South Braintree 

Cole, Evelyn 23 Park Ave., Attleboro 

Connor, Gerald 1 8 Lexington St., Brockton 

Connors, Alice . . 51 Dale St., Dedham 

Crooker, Frank 15 Ruggles St., Westboro 





Freshmen Class Roll 



Coulter, Wesley . 552 Plain St., Stoughton 

^^-Cruz, Priscilla 784 Onset Ave., Onset 

■^ Currier, Gertrude 1 05 Preseott St., North Andover 

Daley, Clement 210 Highland St., Brockton 

Daly, Mary 74 Summer St., Stoughton 

Day, Harriet Fruit St., Norfolk 

Denault, Edna 26 Ingell St., Taunton 

DeWolfe, Barbara 30 Chickatabot Rd., Quincy 

DiNardo, James 98 Edwards St., Quincy 

Dobson, Gladys 4 Parkins Court, Taunton 

Dorosz, Alfred 353 South St., Bridgewater 

Dunn, Harry 308 Main St., Bridgewater 

Dunphy, Mary 19 South Main St., Randolph 

.-•^■fcaton, Elinor 57 Oak St., Middleboro 

Edwards, Helen 14 Arlington St., Haverhill 

-Eisenhaure, Priscilla Haverhill St., North Reading 

Emery, Rachel Gardner's Neck Rd., Swansea 

Farnham, Philip 43 Lincoln St., Needham 

Field, Dorothy 33 Gen. Cobb St., Taunton 

Fischer, Lilly 151 West St., Randolph 

Fiske, Marjorie 158 Main St., Greenfield 

Francis, Lillian 716 Rockdale Ave., New Bedford 

Fruzzetti, Adeline 1100 Pleasant St., Bridgewater 

Galotti, Phyllis 2085 Washington St., Braintree 

Gannon, George 115 Middle St., East Weymouth 

Gardella, Dora 8 South Maple St., Bradford 

Groht, Elizabeth 52 Bayview St., North Weymouth 

Guzzi, Rosina 243 Arlington St., Wollaston 

Haley, Alice 78 West St., Randolph 

*~~ - H ancock, Janet Riverside Ave., Somerset 

Hannigan, Walter 288 K St., South Boston 

Harding, Walter Prospect St., Bridgewater 

Hayden, Bettina 208 Billings St., North Quincy 

\^ Heenan, Alice 450 Pond St., Rockland 

^"-Hegarty, Alice 484 County St.. West Wareham 

Hern, Dorothy 83 Oak St., Taunton 



19 36 
ALPHA 



Hill, Thelma 209 Ash St., Waltham 

Hodgdon, William 1 71 White St., South Weymouth 

Holbrook, Barbara 95 Church St., North Attleboro 

Holtz, Clara 5 Proctor St., Haverhill 

Johnson, Victor .' North Easton 

Judge, Mary 226 Green St., Brockton 

Kachan, Albina Reservoir St., Northboro 

Karimaki, Violet 43 Buckley St., Quincy 

Kaufman, Charles 1 02 Bickford St., Jamaica Plain 

Kelleher, Rita 189 Dover St., Brockton 

Kelley, Helen 1 02 Water St., Quincy 

Keohan, Marie 51 Norfolk St, Weymouth 

Kiley, Dorothy 36 Brush Hill Road, Milton 

Lahey, Katherine 10 Nelson St., Plymouth 

Lang, Rita Western Ave., Holbrook 

Lantz, Doris 629 Union St., South Weymouth 

Larsen, Carol Hixville Road, North Dartmouth 

Leonard, Rose 87 Prospect St., Weymouth 

Lombard, Florence School St., Wellfleet 

Lovett. Anna . Hatfield 

Luce, Walter Vineyard Haven 

Lutted, Helen 104 Cedar St., Stoughton 

Lynch, Rosalie 57 Oliver St., Maiden 

MacLeod, Norma 49 Endicott St., Quincy 

Madden, Margaret 35 Greenway St., Pittsfield 

fahern, Katherine 44 Willow St., Dedham 

Aastovic, Andrew 72 Spring St., Bridgewater 

Matteson, Avis 3 Butler St., Blackstone 

Maurer, Ruth 351 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge 

McFarlin, Thomas Thompson St., Middleboro 

McGhee, William 72 Moffat Rd., Quincy 

Metevier, John 198 West Water St., Rockland 

Moore, Mary 484 Main St., Bridgewater 

Moriarty, Catherine 11 Falmouth St., Brockton 

Morrissey, Margaret 1 91 Liberty St., Rockland 

Mosher, Ernine 1 40 Read St., Somerset 

Murphy, Francis 30 Pleasant St., Randolph 

O'Hayre, Kathleen 85 Beal St., Rockland 

Olsen, Verne 1 25 East St., Wrentham 

Osgood, Carolyn 266 Farrington St., Wollaston 

Osuch, Louise 1051 Piainville Rd., New Bedford 

-Pavan, Reva 284 Water St., Quincy 

Paterson, Henry 41 Bradford St., Quincy 

Payson, Margery 34 Snell St., Brockton 

Penley, Ruth 174 Birch St., Bridgewater 

Perron, Laura 1 24 Brown St., Pittsfield 

Perry, Robert 987 Washington St., Newtonville 

-Pickering, Priscilla Pickering St., Blackstone 

-Pitkin, Alison 2 Chapin Rd., North Andover 

-Procter, Clifford 52 Upland Rd., West Somerville 

Quigley, Mary 18 Oak St., Milton 

Rau, Marcel la 6 Dunedin Place, Wellsley Hills 

Reilly, Clifton 30 Springhill Ave., Bridgewater 

Reinhalter, Marguerite 53 Kimball St., Quincy 

Reposa, Mary 103 Wheaton Ave., Seekonk 

Rizzi, Helen 29 Hayden St., Quincy 

Roberts, Helen 19 Payson Ave., Rockland 

Roper, Sylvia Princeton 

Rosenthal, Leonard 59 Washington St., Dorchester 

Ryce, Cynthia 38 Washburn Ave., Cambridge 

Savaria, Eleanor 52 Rimmon Ave., Chicopee 

Shaw, Charles 825 Main St., South Weymouth 

Shaw, Madeline 88 Pearl St., Middleboro 

-Shepherd, William 230 East Water St., Rockland 

Sherman, Marion 121 Beech Ave., Melrose 

Shields, Mary 42 Franklin Ave., Rockland 

Simon, R. Naomi 20 Semoyne St., Braintree 

Skoczulek, Joanna 71 Hathaway St., New Bedford 

Smethurst, Clara 3123 Riverside Ave., Pottersville 

Smith, France 27 Bates Rd.. East Milton 

Smith, Jean Pine Hill, Westport 



1936 
CLASSES 



Snider, Helen Washington St., Duxbury 

Strange, Ruth 12 Cypress St., Greenfield 

Sweinimer, C. Louise 29 Leavitt St., Brockton 

Taylor, Henry 71 Temple St., North Abington 

Thebodo, Kathryn Stanton Ave., Huntington 

Thomas, Miriam 111 Brook St., Wollaston 

Torrey, Barbara 6 Torrey St., Attleboro 

Trulson, Beatrice 90 Eliot St., Norwood 

Turner, Dorothy 274 Lincoln Ave., Saugus 

Turner, Elizabeth Bow St., North Reading 

_ Walmsley, Irma 99 De Wolfe St., New Bedford 

Walton, Barbara 26 Morton Ave., Saugus 

Warren, Esther 65 Housatonic Ave., Lee 

Wastcoat, Elizabeth 29 Ellington Rd., Wollaston 

.i. nVV ood, Lois 260 Main St., Groveland 



AUTOGRAPHS 



IN MEMORIAM 




DR. ARTHUR CLARKE BOYDEN 
1852-1933 



IN MEMORIAM 





ESTHER TARR 
Class 1933 
1911-1933 



LAURA G. MITCHELL 
Class 1934 
1912-1935 



SO YOUNG, SO FAIR" 




CLIFFORD B. JOHNSON 
Class 1933 
1913-1935 



QUIESCENCE 

A country lane — it rolled between 

Two avenues of drooping trees 

And on them with a lustrous sheen 

The moon looked down. The breeze 

Was gently swaying. The shadows 

Flickered o'er the smooth stream below 

Where calm waters, satin smooth, closed 

Their ripples over banks. The low 

Sweet sound of song was barely heard 

For the aching in the voice robbed 

All else of meaning. A hand stirred, 

A head shook back; the throat sobbed 

For an answer to it all. A night 

So calm. To think that brain 

Could question — why the stream was still, 

The breeze was mild, and, too, the lane 

Slid smoothly on. There was no hill 

To pause and wonder of beyond. 

The moon still shone serene. But then — 

There have been stormy nights, no fond 

Breeze but reckless wind, and when 

It broke, the stream unleashed its strength. 

And even country lanes meet hills 

With no moon shining o'er whole length 

Of them. No wonder, then, this fills 

A heart, a soul, a perplexed head — 

This quiet night. An aching heart 

Reached out. A groping hand stopped dead. 

There was no answer for my part. 

A heart might break — a soul might ache 

But it couldn't move the cold serenity 

Of that night. The moon would shine 

Superciliously on — The country lane 

Would wind its way among the trees unmoved. 

The stream would never change its course. 

Elsie R. I. Anderson. 




VII ItlM 
COOrERATITE 
AMOCIATIOW 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

President Barbara Albret 

Vice-President Ruth Cronin 

Secretary Isabelle Walsh 

Treasurer Helen Russell 

The Student Co-operative Association is the largest and most important organi- 
zation in the school. Upon entering the college, every student automatically be- 
comes a member of this association. 

The purpose of the organization is to regulate all matters pertaining to student 
life which do not fall under the jurisdiction of the faculty, to foster a spirit of unity and 
co-operation in all ways possible among the students of the college, and to maintain 
the high standards of Bridgewater Teachers College. This objective is attained 
through the efficient work of the various councils. 

Foremost among these is the Student Council, with its truly representative member- 
ship, consisting of men and women, day and dormitory students, class and division 
representatives, and heads of the outstanding activities. 

The Student Council directs affairs pertaining to the entire student group. The 
aim of the Student Council is to act as a medium between faculty and students in rais- 
ing the standards of scholarship, conduct, and activities. This group tries to improve 
the life of the college and initiate the best movements of student collegiate life into 
the school. 

Meetings are held the fourth Friday of the month with compulsory attendance in 
order to insure efficiency in the work of the council. 

This year the council has created a new committee, the Civic Committee, whose 
duty it is to improve the conditions about the college. 

Isabelle Walsh, Secretary 




B. Bump, S. Riley, J. Nolan, S. Lovett, F. Moran, J. Peebles, 
G. Johnston, G. Conner 

O. Skerston, C. Volmer, M. Donahue, M. Bartell, D. Kelleher, N. Dean, 
B. Ludden, A. Carr, M. Butterfield 

A. Lovett, I. Leino, R. Gonin, B. Albret, I. Walsh, H. Russell, R. Cushing 

E. Lafaver, E. Moura, L. Andrews, M. Barnes, M. Eyre, B. Greenwood, M. Francis 



19 3 6 
ALP HA 




Row 3-D. Bearse, D. Norton, J. Rigby, P. Morgan, P. Hull, R. Davis, T. Beck. 
Row 2— A. Wehter, M. Reidy, H. Robinson, B. Polsey, G. Dobson, A. Pitkin. 
Row 1 — M. Connell, B. Smith, D. Kelleher, B. Greenwood, M. Moore, A. Carr, G. French. 



DORMITORY COUNCIL 



President Barbara Greenwood 

Vice-President Muriel Moore 

Secretary . Doris Kelleher 

Treasurer Alice Carr 



Dormitory Council has been successful in carrying on the duties of former years 
and has inaugurated several new ideas. 

Approximately five hundred guests were entertained at "Open House," when 
parents and friends met the faculty of the college. Many of our graduates were wel- 
comed back Alumni weekend. 

One of the outstanding accomplishments of our council has been the innovation 
of Informal Study-Hour. This new policy is working out successfully through the co- 
operation of all the girls. The usual "ten-fifteen permissions" may now be taken on 
Sunday nights. 

Another new idea was that of giving Contract Bridge lessons to many enthusiastic 
bridge players. 

We have enjoyed representing the girls in the dormitories on the council and 
hope that our changes will make dormitory life happier. 

Doris Kelleher, Secretary 



STUDENT 
COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 

WOODWARD HALL 

President Gertrude French 

Vice-President Eunice Perkins 

Secretary Betty Norton 

Treasurer Dorothy Bearse 

Redecorating and modernizing have occupied the attention of Gertrude French 
and the house board in their effort to create a friendly spirit and cheery atmosphere 
in Woodward Hall. 

The appearance of the radio room was improved by new pictures and carefully 
selected furnishings such as a couch cover, pillows, and lampshades. A piano, which 
was a gift from Mrs. Arthur C. Boyden, has been greatly appreciated and enjoyed 
by the girls. With the addition of new chair coverings and curtains, the lobby has 
become a pleasing introduction to the attractive student rooms. There we find much 
originality displayed. Sports enthusiasts welcomed the innovation of new and 
varied games downstairs in the game room. 

House meetings have been enlivened by planned entertainments given by each 
class. We have uncovered much hidden talent in our performers. 

Our social activity included the annual Woodward Dance in the fall, and a tea 
in the early spring. 

To our successors — as enjoyable and happy a year as we have had! 

Betty Norton, Secretary 

TILUNGHAST HALL 

President Barbara Smith 

Vice-President Madeline Connell 

Secretary Joan Rigby 

Treasurer Elizabeth Cusick 

In September, the old residents of Tillinghast came back to a full house and 
welcomed the freshmen and newcomers from Woodward and from other colleges. The 
spirit of friendliness; always characteristic of Tillinghast, was intensified by the "peanut 
sister" idea. If the girls received gifts or surprises during the year, it was the doings 
of their peanut sisters, and what fun it was trying to discover who they were. 

We all enjoyed the Hallowe'en party at which the Freshmen were initiated with 
all the solemnity and ceremony due the ghost of Nicholas Tillinghast, but they showed 
us what they could accomplish and proved to be true Tillinghastites at the annual 
Christmas party. 

There have been changes, too, in Tillinghast, always for the better. The over- 
head lights in the students' rooms were renovated during the summer,- besides this, 
floor plugs and lights in the closets were installed. To our reception room have been 
added a grandfather's clock and new rugs and table runners to make the room more 
attractive for our Saturday afternoon teas. 

As we look back upon a successful and enjoyable year, we hope that those to 
come will be just as happy and prosperous. 

Joan E. Rigby, Secretary 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 3— M. Hollenbeck, M. Shields, A. Connors, M. Donahue, R. Kelleher, I. Walsh, I. Walmsley, 

R. Penley, M. Bragg. 
Row 2 — K. Donahue, M. Randall, A. Anderson, I. Leino, R. Faunce, R. Cassidy, V. Gaynor. 
Row 1 — M. Bardini, R. Lang, E. Denault, M. Cassidy, J. Hancock. 

DAY STUDENT COUNCIL 

President Ida Leino 

Vice-President Rebecca Faunce 

Secretary Anna Anderson 

Treasurer Marie Randall 

This year the Day Student Association has proved of what mettle they are made. 
From the beginning, activity has been our watchword. The room we hoped and 
planned for last year became a reality. Under faculty guidance our artistic mem- 
bers arranged a very pleasant room which we are enjoying to the utmost. 

Very fittingly, the first of our social events was a tea, which formally opened the 
recreation room to the students of the college. 

Not satisfied with a room, we immediately started to make the room even more 
enjoyable for its occupants — a radio was our objective. Our first financial attempt 
was a style show, which was enthusiastically attended by students and faculty alike. 
With the returns we were able to purchase a radio. 

As has been customary, we sponsored a social, and as usual, it was a success. 

If the active program of this year's organization is continued by succeeding groups, 
the day students will continue to be a most vital part of Bridgewater life. 

Anna Anderson, Secretary 



COOPERATIVE 



STUDENT 
ASSOCIATION 




■ 



Row 2 — D. Moulson, K. Donahue, G. Cosgrove, M. Connell, F. Morgan, W. Quinn, V. Prario. 
Row 1 — R. Faunce, L. Kavanaugh, R. Cronin, R. Flaherty, M. Moore. 



SOCIAL ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 



Chairman 
Secretary 



Ruth Cronin 
Eunice Perkins 



The Social Activities Committee is truly representative of the entire college. 
Its membership includes people from every class and from various organizations. 
This committee is responsible for planning a great deal of the social life of the college. 

The first social event of the year was the Acquaintance Social. Dancing and 
games were enjoyed, and the Freshmen were given an excellent opportunity to meet 
the faculty and the upperclassmen. 

Everyone looks to the Social Activities Committee to start the regular Friday 
night socials; so we gave our social the second week of school and used as our theme 
the Freshman initiation and the traditional sack-rush. 

In November we attempted a more dignified affair, the S. C. A. formal. 

This year we have tried to enlarge the usual program of the committee. Under 
Miss Pope's guidance we have endeavored to acquire the art of giving a successful 
tea. Everyone has been given an opportunity to help in all phases of the work. 
We began our training by having a small informal tea for the committee and a few 
guests. Later we assisted at the Alumni tea. Open House tea, the tea given during 
the W. A. A. convention, and the Freshmen teas. 

We all feel that this experience has proven valuable to us, and we hope that the 
committee of next year will be able to continue this work which we have begun. 

Eunice Perkins, Secretary 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 3 — W. Gaudette, L. Halzel, C. Blair, D. Holmes, Mr. Hurfinglon. 
Row 2 — Miss Rand, H. Robinson, R. Cushing, Miss Thompson, R. Calen. 
Row 1— P. Esau, P. Hull, F. Kuchmeister, L. Eldridge. 



LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 



FACULTY 
Miss Rand 
Miss Thompson 
Mr. Huffington 



SENIORS 

Rita Cushing, Chairman 
Phyllis Esau 
Clarence Blair 
Lawrence Halzel 



JUNIORS 
Harriet Robinson 
Ruth Calen 
Louise Eldridge 
Daniel Holmes 



SOPHOMORES 
Pauline Hull 
Florence Kuchmeister 
Wilder Gaudette 



With the realization that there are always those who cannot be pleased, Culture 
Fund endeavors to choose outstanding speakers for the college, who will bring satis- 
faction to the majority. 

The selection of the speaker rests with the committee, consisting of three mem- 
bers of the faculty and representatives of the student body. An effort is made to 
cover as many different fields of subject matter as possible with the hope of adding 
some new interest to that which already has been presented. 






STUDENT 
COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 

Mr. John Martin, dance critic for the New York Times, introduced to the college 
the modern dance in his lecture, "The Ancient Art of Modern Dancing." Because 
of the newness of the subject, Mr. Martin's extensive background, and the very 
pleasing personality which he presented as a speaker, this program was enjoyed 
by all and considered very successful. 

The second lecturer, Dr. John Haynes Holmes, minister of the Community Church 
in New York, spoke on "Is our Present Civilization Worth Saving?" Dr. Holmes' 
ideas were a challenge to all and were a contributing factor to the knowledge gained 
from such addresses. 

Geography was the next field covered in an illustrated lecture by Dr. Clarence 
F. Jones of Clark University. Dr. Jones' lecture, "The Highland Indians of Peru and 
Bolivia," was most interesting owing to the fact that the speaker lived and studied 
in South America among the people about whom he lectured. 

We hope that future speakers will meet with as much approval as did those chosen 
this year. 



LECTURE FUND PROGRAMS 

1932-1933 

October 1 Mrs. Katherine Osborne 

"How to Collect a Library Without Money" 

November 29 Rulon Y. Robinson 

Tenor Singer 

January 1 Harold E. B. Speight 

"Biographies of Living Men" 

February 1 Dr. Edward Howard Griggs 

"The Greatest Thing in the World" 

March 1 John Lewis 

"Chinese Music" 

April 1 Joseph G. Reynolds, Jr. 

"Stained Glass" 

May 1 A. H. Blackington 

"The Romance of News Gathering" 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 

1933-1934 

October 25 Edward Weeks 

"From an Editor's Easy Chair" 

November 28 » Gerrit Beneker 

"Economics From an Artist's Point of View" 

February 26 Dr. Blakeslee 

"World Relations" 

March 8 Tony Sarg 

"Behind the Scenes with Marionettes" 

May 2 Whiting Williams 

"The New Deal in Germany, Russia and the United States 

May 25 Rev. James G. Gilkey 

"Secret of Getting a Lot Done" 

1934-1935 

October 22 Bronson de Cou 

"Dream Pictures" 

November 17 Clare Tree Major Players 

"Pocohonfas" 

January 15 Cornelia Stratton Parker 

"Travel versus College Education" 

February 4 John Erskine 

"A Better Education" 

May 27 Prof. J. Anton De Haas 

"Economic Conflict in the World" 

1935-1936 

November 1 John Martin 

"The Ancient Art of Modern Dancing" 

November 4 Dr. John Haynes Holmes 

"Is Our Present Civilization Worth Saving?" 

January 3 Dr. Clarence F. Jones 

"The Highland Indians of Peru and Bolivia" 

March 30 Dr. William Lyon Phelps 

"Contemporary Books" 



STUDENT 
COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 
1935-1936 

September 13 Acquaintance Social 

September 27 Campus Comment Social 

October 4 Social Activities Committee Dance 

October 18 Senior Social 

October 25 Plymouth County Teachers Association 

November 1-2 W. A. A. Conference 

November 11 Armistice Day 

November 15 Dramatic Club Play 

November 16 Alumni Tea Dance 

November 22 Student Co-operative Association Formal 

November 27-December 2 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 6 Junior Social 

December 13 Woodward Social 

December 20-January 2 Christmas Recess 

January 3 Sophomore Social 

January 10 Men's Club Social 

January 17 Sophomore-Junior Prom 

January 31 Men's Club Play 

February 1 B. T. C. A. A. Formal 

February 7 Day Students' Social 

February 14 Mardi Gras 

February 22-March 2 Winter Recess 

March 6 Frat Dance 

March 13 Orchestra Concert 

March 20 Men's Amateur Night 

March 21 Student Co-operative Association Informal 

April 3 Freshman Social 

April 10 Good Friday 

April 18-27 Spring Recess 

May 1 Glee Club Concert 

May 8 Alpha Summer Formal 

May 15 Dramatic Club Play 

May 22 Men's Glee Club 

June 5 Campus Carnival 

June 7 Baccalaureate 

June 8 Senior Prom 

June 11 Faculty Reception 

June 12 Graduation 



NONBELIEVER 

'You say there's a God. 
Well, I don't believe it! 
I know that it shocks you, 
But that's how I 'reel'! 

'All to their notions" 
I said, and I left him,- 
To my way of thinking, 
The man wasn't real. 

Richard Dwyer 



SPRING FEVER 

Two neat swallows, 
Darting, dashing, 
Concentrated energy, 
Seeking out a nest. 

There they go a-flying, 
Fast as rifle bullets; 
Now they light upon a branch 
Each to take a rest. 

Suddenly the female starts 
And is on the wing again. 
Male goes quickly after her, 
Dressed in "swallow's best." 

Then one day their nest I find 
Hungry mouths are opened wide 
Mrs. Swallow chirps to say, 
'Nature did the rest!" 

Richard Dwyer 




f I 111 ■► n 

\a li IIP » » 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 



CAMPUS COMMENT 



Campus Comment has maintained the policy established by the staff of 1934-35 
of issuing a four page edition as frequently as finances and the school calendar has 
permitted. 

For the first time in the history of the school paper, a complete edition of Campus 
Comment appeared on the first college day of the year. This issue introduced both 
new and old students to coming social events, vacation happenings, and changes in 
courses of study. 

The first social event of the year, with the exception of the Acquaintance Dance, 
was sponsored by Campus Comment, which made it both a financial and a social 
success. 

To introduce new members and welcome the old, a novel treasure hunt and 
frankfort roast was held in the early fall. 

In continuing the precedent established by the staff of the preceding year, a 
basketball rally was held before the annual Fitchburg basketball game, which ex- 
tensively promoted college spirit. Assembly programs were held preceding the rally 
as practice periods for cheers and songs. 

Another project carried on by Campus Comment was the arrangement of trans- 
portation by bus to Fitchburg of one-hundred sixty-four students. 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 



*'l 




«■? 




iLft 


mm!: ^MjmmmW-. m-^^^^i^^W" ~ ^^HK 


i||]Lfyi 


B ' ■ « 


>^HHofl H^^^V - 1 1 ^^^kr mN 




■IkL 


i 1 H' — -JBLB 


ft V 


^^Pr^l 




jmrn^.i^^"**-^** 







Row 4 — M. Moore, M. Connell, H. Cassels, A. McKee, M. Osborne, H. Webber, R. Leonard, 

M. Bentley, E. Campbell, E. Savaria. 
Row 3 — M. von Bergen, A. Larson, M. Candy, A. O'Brien, E. Vanelli, E. Butterfield, G. Behan, 

M. Keohan, B. Torrey, K. Gavitt, L. Perron, C. Hayden. 
Row 2— K. Johnson, I. Leino, W. Nolan, T. Wolfson, M. Eyre, G. Cosgrove, N. Beaton, P. Hull, 

D. Moulson. 
Row 1 — E. Conley, M. Shaw, M. Reynolds, K. Flaherty, M. Goldstein, G. Thomas. 



CAMPUS COMMENT STAFF 

Executive Editor Muriel Eyre 

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Johnson 

Editorial Writer Elizabeth Conley 

Managing Editor Thelma Wolfson 

News Editors Mildred Goldstein, Margaret Carlson 

Copy Editors Pauline Hull, Mary Osborne 

Alumni Editor Edith Hayden 

Mens' Reporter John Julin 

Sports Editors Kathryn Flaherty, Marshall Nay 

Assistant Sports Editor William Nolan 

Make-up Editors Marie von Bergen, Elaine Vanelli 

Technicians Alice Larsen, Anna McKee 

Exchange Edito Sylvia Pentikainen 

Typists Katherine Gavitt, Mary Connel| 

Christine Hayden, Esther Butterfield. Laura Perron 

Reporters: Eileen McDonough, Helen Cassels, Anna O'Brien, Helen Webber, Ida Leino, Eleanor 

Campbell, Marjorie Moore, Martha Reynolds, Virginia Chadwick, Gladys Thomas, 

Eleanor Savaria, Barbara Torrey, Marie Keohan, Geraldine Behan, Rose Leonard, 

Marjorie Bentley 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager Gail Cosgrove 

Advertising Managers Marjorie Candy, Dorcas Moulson 

Circulation Managers Ernest Bazinet, Charles Witherell 






19 3 6 
ALPHA 



DRAMATIC CLUB 

Director Miss Moffitt 

President Elsa Johnson 

Vice-President Barbara Schmalz 

Secretary Helen Robertson 

Property Mistress Ruth Davis 

The aim of the Dramatic Club is to provide opportunity (or those in the college 
who possess dramatic ability to develop this talent through play production and 
through discussion of dramatics. 

Each year the club presents three plays: a modern play in the Fall, a Christmas 
play, and a Shakespearian play. The club attends one or two professional plays in 
Boston. 

Philip Barrie's "The Youngest" was selected for our first play of the year. It was 
decided that men students should portray the male roles again this year as this idea 
proved so successful in our last modern play. 

"The Youngest" was presented on November 15th with the following cast: 

Mrs. Winslow Elsa Johnson 

Muff Dorothy Cushman 

Nancy Anne Surinski 

Mark Benjamin Bump 

Augusta Barbara Schmalz 

Alan James Peebles 

Oliver Hubert Johnson 

. Richard Frank Crooker 

Katie Helen Robertson 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 




R. Davis, N. Dean, E. Johnson, A. Surinski, Miss Moffitt, B. Schmalz, H. Robertson, D. Cushman. 

To serve as a grand finale to the formal Christmas dinner of this year, the club 
presented "The Littlest Shepherd" immediately following the Christmas festivities on 
the evening of December 19th. The following morning it was again presented for 
the benefit of the Training School. 

As is the custom of the club at this time of year, ten dollars was donated to the 
Training School library. 

During the month of January, the club was fortunately able to see Cornelia Otis 
Skinner in the portrayal of "The Mansion on the Hudson" at the Shubert Theatre in 
Boston. 

Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice", our final play of the year, was presented 
in the spring and was enthusiastically supported by the college. 

The following cast was selected for this play: 

Antonio Benjamin Bump 

Bassanio James Peebles 

Portia Elsa Johnson 

Nerissa Ruth Davis 

Lorenzo Justin McCarthy 

Jessica Barbara Schmalz 

Shyloclc Joseph Bongarzone 

Launcelot Dorothy Cushman 

Gobbo Helen Robertson 

Tubal John Metevier 

Gratiano Frank Bailey 

Salarino William McGee 

Salanio Raymond Burnefte 

Duke of Venice Natalie Dean 

Prince of Aragon Anne Surinski 

The club wishes to express gratitude to those who have helped to make our plays 
a success. 

Helen M. Robertson, Secretary. 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 4 — M. Moore, M. McDonald, F. Gillis, P. Roberts, E. McDonough. 
Row 3 — C. Gilmartin, A. Carr, B. Albert, M. Salo, F. Kuchmeister, C. Vollmer, P. Morgan. 
Row 2— M. Hartford, C. Griffiths, Miss Vining, K. Ross, Miss Carter, P. Hull, P. Colby. 
Row 1 — P. Esau, D. Moufson, E. Moura, E. Levow. 

LIBRARY CLUB 

President Kathryn Ross 

Vice-President Carol Griffiths 

Secretary Polly Hull 

Treasurer Marjorie Hartford 

Beginning with its first meeting and continuing throughout the year, Library Club 
has carried on a series of activities and delightful programs which were the outgrowth 
of an enthusiastic interest in contemporary publications and their authors. During 
the past year, a new plan was conceived by which the members of the club were 
grouped under a phase of literature they were most eager to learn more of — biog- 
raphy, travel, fiction, or poetry. Each group read the latest books included in their 
particular division, discussed them, and presented their criticisms to the other members. 

Presenting an opportunity to learn more of the literary world to the chosen few 
members is not the only aim of Library Club — it also supplies opportunities for culture 
to the entire student body. The lending library, which has become so popular, has 
added many of the year's most discussed books, among them being "And Gladly 
Teach," by Bliss Perry, "The Sun Also Rises," by Ernest Hemingway, and "Mary, 
Queen of Scots," by Stefan Zweig. 

In November, Miss Ruth Campbell, a recent graduate of Emerson College, 
gave a charming, animated presentation of a portion of Bess Streeter Aldrich's "Miss 
Bishop" for our chapel program. 

Outstanding on the club's social calendar were the dates of the trip into Boston 
to see one of the year's best plays and of the social held in the spring. 

Polly T. Hull, Secretary 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 




Row 4— B. Kimball, K. Ross, T. Newbury, C. Blair, F. Jagiello, V. Zubrzycki, L. Halzel, C. Coulter, 

M. Gallipeau. 
Row 3 — M. Freeman, E. Cadwell, M. Callery, A. Carr, E. Butterfield, H. Kelly, V. Lucey, 

A. Matteson, D. Field, M. Mahady, A. Johnson, H. Russell, P. Colby, A. Murrill, 

H. Kidston, M. McDonald. 
Row 2 — E. Creney, C. Reilly, M. Murray, R. Turner, B. Barsky, Miss Smith, P. Gricius, I. Walsh, 

A. Drinkwater. 
Row 1— O. Martini, E. Conley, H. Kelly, M. Morse, C. Farr, M. Reynolds, F. Smith, P. Pickering. 

TOPICS OF THE DAY 

President Belle Barsky 

Vice-President Mary Murray 

Secretary Ruth Turner 

Treasurer Prakseda Gricius 

This year Topics-of-the-Day Club has been very successful under the leadership 
of its president, Belle Barsky. The membership has increased to a total of fifty-eight, 
a new peak in the membership for the club. 

The aim of the club is "the mutual improvement of its members through a study 
of the vital topics of the day." Through our discussions of such topics as "Italy in 
Ethiopia," "The AAA," "The Youth Movement in Europe," and "The Progress of 
Japan" we not only have an opportunity for relaxation and social contacts, but also 
for the gaining of a basic understanding of the problems confronting the world. 

The club is governed and the programs are arranged by the executive board, 
which is made up of the club officers and a representative from each class. Besides 
planning interesting programs for group discussion the board also makes arrange- 
ments for a few outside speakers each year. 

We hope through the help of our faculty adviser, and this series of varied pro- 
grams, to accomplish our aim and also to instill in the members a love for current 
history. Ruth Turner, Secretary 



1 9 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 4 — R. Guzzi, M. Sullivan, R. Murphy, C. Moriarty, A. Leonard, M. Kispert, M. Sherman. 
Row 3— M. Whitney, G. Dobson, T. Hill, K. Kelly, Miss Bradford, M. Gauszis, R. Penley, 

A. Halloran, I, Wash. 
Row 2 — E. Harlow, D. Waters, M. Borgatti, H. Dacko, A. McKee, M. Osborne, R. Gonin. 
Row 1— M. Snow, M. Reynolds, J. Paull, B. Allen, A. Lovett. 

FRENCH CLUB 

Presidente Helen Dacko 

Vice-Presidente Magda Borgatti 

Secretaire Anna McKee 

Tresoriere ■. Doris Waters 

Bibliothecaire Helen Leonard 

Reporter Mary Osborne 

Voici encore I'annee du Mardi Gras — cette fois-ci a Paris. Le nom du carnaval 
— "Voici Paris." A Paris, naturellement, on voit les types parisiens — les artistes, 
les Apaches, les uniques. A notre Paris dont la mise-en scene est le gymnase de 
Bridgewater on vit aussi des types parisiens — mais peut-etre vaut-il mieux les appeler 
tout simplement les "je ne sais quoi." Aussi il y avait toutes les belles reines, dont 
it y eut une, la favorite, la reine des reines, qui regno ce soir-la avec son camarade, 
le roi du carnaval. 

A part -le Mardi Gras, I'annee s'est rendue remarquable par son but de parler 
francais aux "dormitories," — le premier pas en route pour I'etablissement d'une 
Maison Francaise! Qui sait? 

Le club s'abonna a deux series des filmes montres a Harvard; et des membres 
ont aussi assiste a ceux du Theatre Fine Arts. 

Le but du cercle, s'amuser en s'instruisant, s'est ainsi accompli a la satisfaction 
de tous. 

Anna McKee, Secretaire 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 



MARDI GRAS— VOICI PARIS 
February 14, 1936 



When Le Cercle Francais began making its plans for the Mardi Gras, which 
took place on February 14, 1936, it decided to go modern and show its guests a bit 
of Parisian night life. Accordingly, ambitious members set about designing scenery, 
shops, and cafes to change the Albert Gardner Boyden Gymnasium into a fitting 
place for the Mardi Gras revellers. 

Katherine Kelly was chairman of the decoration committee, and planned a drop 
for the east end of the gymnasium, which showed a beautiful view of L'Arc de Tri- 
omphe. 

Mary Gauszis transfoimed the alcove under the balcony at the back of the gym- 
nasium into Jenane's style shop, whose silver-curtained windows showed dresses and 
accessories for both evening and sports wear. 

Above Jenane's was a gay Alsatian cafe, flying the American flag. This was 
planned by Jeannette Paul. Tables for four were covered with blue, white and red 
covers, and, because it was February 14, tiny trees on which grew many, many red 
hearts were used for center-pieces. 

The orchestra played in the corner near the style shop, while near-by was a flower 
shop with a large variety of flowers. 

The patrons and patronesses for the affair were Dr. and Mrs. Zenos E. Scott, 
Miss S. Elizabeth Pope, Mr. John Kelly, Miss Priscilla Nye, and Mr. and Mrs. Balfour 
Tyndall. They were greeted by the guests in a salutation march. 

The floats this year were unusually good, the banner for the most representative 
going to Campus Comment for the float "An Editor's Nightmare." 

Esther Thorley and Stephen Lovett were elected by the students as Queen and 
King of the Mardi Gras. 

Prizes for the best costumes were awarded to Barbara Albret, who represented 
Mamie of the comic strip, most grotesque,- Rachel Lane, a Dutch girl all in blue, most 
beautiful; and Marie von Bergen, in star-spangled black with a silver crescent in her 
hair, most Parisian. 

A feature of the evening was a style show from Jenane's, of which Miss Gauszis 
was the proprietor. French costumes representing dress from the fifteenth century to 
the present were modelled. 

The dance ended a few minutes before midnight with the arrival of Pere Careme, 
who bade everyone leave for home. Last of all, Le Cercle sang its good-night song, 
"Bon Soir, Confreres." 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 4 — M. von Bergen, B. Hayden, C. Gardner, R. Blaney, V. Kundiz, M. Rau. 

Row 3 — F. Kuchmeister, M. Chaput, R. Kelleher, Miss Bradford, B. Torrey, M. Powell, A. Hepperle. 

Row 2 — K. Graham, A. Larson, I. Jenkins, K. Johnson, M. Costello, G. Dobson. 

Row 1 — R. Barchi, H. Edwards, L. Sweinimer, E. Turner, P. Eisenhaure. 

DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN 

President Isabel Jenkins 

Vice-President Alice Larson 

Secretary Katherine Johnson 

Treasurer Catherine Graham 

Librarian Helen Costello 

With the introduction of German in the curriculum of Bridgewater Teachers Col- 
lege last year, there arose an interest in, and a desire for, a German Club. These 
desires matured into reality, so that this year the school has its baby club, "Der 
Deutsche Verein." 

Through the generous help of Miss Edith Bradford, the faculty adviser, and the 
capable leadership of its president, Isabel Jenkins, "Der Deutsche Verein" has rapidly 
become a well-organized club, and a worthy member of the group taking part in 
extra-curricular activities of the school. 

The club was fortunate, on December 4, in having Herr Carstensen and Hubert 
Hundt, a German exchange teacher and student from Tabor Academy. They 
spoke at a special meeting to which the school was invited. 

On December 12, a successful Christmas party was enjoyed by the members. 
The meetings for the remainder of the year were concerned with such topics as travel, 
drama, music, games, holidays, and current events, all directly related to Germany. 
The Freshmen put a finishing touch to the year's program by presenting a German play 
in May. Katherine Johnson, Secretary 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 




Row 3 — W. Nolan, D. Holmes, F. Jagiello, G. Leonard, L. Alpert. 
Row 2 — R. Turner, A. Wehter, E. Harlow, M. Candy, V. Prario, S. Fleish. 
Row 1 — H. Pearson, J. True, D. Jones, Miss Graves, E. Taitz, M. Butterfield. 



SCIENCE CLUB 

President Doris Jones 

Vice-President Emanuel Taitz 

Secretary Marjorie Butterfield 

Treasurer John True 

Science Club is an organization from which many varied benefits may be derived. 
Admission to it is based on scholarship and a genuine interest in science. 

The club affords an opportunity to further the students' interest in science and to 
carry scientific inquiry into fields beyond those touched upon in the class room. 

Club activities are diversified. At some of the meetings there are talks given 
by club members or by guest speakers who are well versed in their particular branch 
of science. To help realize the varied science interests of the different members, the 
club is sub-divided into interest groups. Each group has its own specific subject and 
devotes its attention to acquiring additional knowledge in this field. 

Round-table discussions on current science topics proved to be of unfailing 
value in furthering the scientific outlook of the club. As field trips are always a part 
of real scientific study, trips to the Agassiz Museum, the Arnold Arboretum, the 
Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, and the Audubon Bird Sanctuary at Sharon 
have at times proved to be instructive as well as enjoyable. The club is welded to- 
gether socially by such events as its initiation, installations, and picnics, and these, 
together with the educational phases of club meetings, give a well-rounded program 
of activities for Science Club. Marjorie Butterfield, Secretary 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 4 — E. Church, D. Edson, D. Jones, A. Haley, M. Reidy, C. Caspersen, E. McDonough, 

M. Francis, J. Rigby. 
Row 3 — A. Wehter, A. Sullivan, G. Behan, R. Strange, M. Deane, D. Boyle, M. Connell, B. Smith, 

P. Heyworth. 
Row 2 — M. Smith, P. Gricius, C. Vollmer, D. Thompson, Mr. Stearns, W. Quinn, M. Hartford, 

M. Chambers, V. Cochrane. 
Row 1 — A. Perry, O. Martini, M. Fiske, M. Cassidy, C. Larsen. 

GARDEN CLUB 

President Doris Thompson 

Vice-President. Wilma Quinn 

Secretary Marjorie Hartford 

Treasurer Carol Vollmer 

Garden Club, better known by its members as TC, has concluded another suc- 
cessful year. 

After the initiation in September, all newly-admitted members were informed of 
the meaning of TC, a privilege extended only to those who gain admittance to the 
Club. 

So many students were interested in the aim of TC, that is, "to promote interest in 
the growth and spread of horticulture among college students," that both afternoon 
and evening groups were formed to accommodate all the members. 

Each meeting included a business and occupational session. In the latter, cut- 
tings of various shrubs and plants were made either for personal use or for school pur- 
poses. 

Many valuable lectures were given by Mr. Stearns, the club adviser, and by the 
club members. 

The social life of TC included small parties for the members, bonfire suppers, a 
trip to the Flower Show, a social, and a chapel program. 

The Garden Club's outstanding constructive contribution to the school was the 
decoration of the auditorium during the Christmas season. 

Marjorie Hartford, Secretary 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 



THE GREENHOUSE 

Without our glass enclosure, the 

ground is bare and hard. 
Harsh winds have torn the summer 

clothing from the trees 
Leaving them but bare frame-works 

of what has been. 
But inside the greenhouse 

is faerie warmth and summer. 
Tall, fan-shaped plants vie with 

taller ones 
Stretching like small children to 

reach the desired. 
Graceful ferns bow lacy fronds 

on every side 
Filling the benches like tropical 

jungles. 
Pots of tiny cuttings are 

miniature forests 
Arranged in rows along the 

side benches. 
Jerusalem cherries, bowed under 

heavy fruit 
Form a colorful orchard on 

the central island. 
Scrambling vines race each other 

over the sides, 
And jump to reach the ground below. 
Bright spots of sunshine splatter 
Showing a lovely pattern of 

natural harmony. 



THE GARDEN 

Let us go into the garden. 

The moon sails high 

Like paper, glued to the sky 

With not even a cloud to hang to. 

Shut the garden gate with care, 

And tip-toe down the gravel path, 

Not to disturb the immense stillness. 

Flowers nod as we pass, 

Dressed in pastel colors 

With a tint of moonlight blue 

Like sylvan fairies dancing. 

See the tree in the center, 

The sentinel of the garden, 

Spreading leafy branches to include 

The whole garden under protecting wings. 

Everything is duplicated by the shadows, 

Huge, black, lifeless forms, 

The world without the hidden flame of life. 

We pass out through the same gate 

Leaving the garden silent. 



CHANGE OF SCENE 

Wild wind wailing in the wood 
Soft snow slipping down the field 

Eerie ghosts. 

Where yesterday we watched 

A red riot raid a maple 

And gold grain gorge upon the sun. 

— Catherine Reilly . 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 4 — A. Allen, C. Fair, R. Farley, L. Conley, N. Beaton, M. Reposa, J. Smith, A. Pitkin. 

Row 3 — G. Behan, G. Dobson, E. Butrerfield, B. Barton, D. Turner, H. Kelly, R. Guzii, R. Lang, 

G. Crowell. 
Row 2 — P. Gricius, M. Goldstein, D. Dennison, Mr. Stearns, H. Cassels, M. Butterfield, E. Cadwell. 
Row 1 — E. Denault, O. Martini, J. Paul, C. Larsen. 

HOBBY CLUB 

President Helen Cassels 

Vice-President. Catherine Donahue 

Secretary-Treasurer Doris Dennison 

Although a comparatively recent innovation in extra-curricular activities, Hobby 
Club is making rapid strides towards becoming one of the most popular clubs in the 
college. The members have one earnest purpose in mind — to further their own hobbies 
and to acquire other worthwhile ones. Some of the most representative of the hobbies 
are: stamps, coins, relics, knitting, animals. More singular ones include: bottles, 
block-printing, and favors. 

More than ever during the recent period of financial stress, people, regardless of 
position in life, have been turning to hobbies as a diversion from the grim facts facing 
them. 

This group of young men and women realize the value that hobbies are to 
have in the future and are taking advantage of a remarkable opportunity to avail 
themselves of as much information on the subject as possible. 

The young people have in their leader, Mr. Stearns, an ardent hobbyist who does 
much to inspire and motivate the work of the members of the Hobby Club. 

Doris R. Dennison, Secretary 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 




Row 4 — H. Robinson, M. Connell, A. Weldon, R. Flaherty. 

Row 3— P. Gricius, M. Bartell, E. Taitz, S. Lovett, J. Partridge, H. Crowdis, H. Kovalchuk. 

Row 2— T. Westerling. W. Quinn, R. Sawyer, B. Polsey, M. Butterfield. 

Row 1 — M. Francis, N. Beaton, A. Pitkin, A. Athan. 



CAMERA CLUB 

President . Rita Sawyer 

Vice-President Wilma Quinn 

Secretary-Treasurer Barbara Polsey 

Under the enthusiastic guidance of our faculty adviser, Mr. Reynolds, Camera 
Club has enjoyed a most successful and profitable year. 

This year the club admitted twelve new members, increasing the total mem- 
bership to twenty-four. 

The new-comers, under the leadership of the more experienced members, learned 
to develop, print, and enlarge their own pictures. Several unusual views of the 
campus and buildings were taken and a prize was awarded to the member with the 
best enlargement. 

The social life of the club has also played an important part this year. We have 
enjoyed several evenings,- one an initiation party at the home of Mr. Reynolds, also 
a Christmas and a Valentine party. 

We hope that as a result of our work this year all members have developed an 
interest in, and an understanding of, photography. 

Barbara Polsey, Secretary 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




D. Holmes, J. Julin, F. Moran, G. Cosgrove. 

MEN'S CLUB 

President Francis Moran 

Vice-President E. Gail Cosgrove 

Secretary . John A. Julin 

Treasurer Daniel H. Holmes 

The activities of the Men's Club during the year 1935-36 started off with the 
annual banquet, in October. Dr. Scott, Dean Kelly, members of the faculty, super- 
intendents from surrounding towns, and several alumni, were our guest speakers. 
The youthful Freshman band entertained and the more senile Junior quartet rendered 
several old favorites. 

The Men's Club social was held on January ten, in the Albert Gardner Boyden 
Gymnasium. 

For our play this year we chose the farce, "Here Comes Charlie," in which only 
men took part. Miss Moffitt should be given credit for the way in which the play 
was received. 

Men's Amateur Night was sponsored in the Horace Mann Auditorium on 
March twenty-seven. The program included individual numbers from the men of the 
four classes. 

Some of the speakers who have addressed us this year are Dr. Scott, president 
of the college, Hon. James Warren, superintendent of the State Farm at Bridgewater, 
and Mr. Stearnes Cushing, superintendent of schools of Middleboro. 

Having some of the meetings held at noontime this year perhaps accounts for 
the large turnout at the meetings. Then again, the Club has been backed by the men 
more this year than ever before. 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 

A new feature to arouse interest in the Men's Club Room in Tillinghast Hall was 
the introduction of ping-pong tables. Ping-pong-ers were to be seen at all hours 
paddling the little ball back and forth over the net. The enthusiasm aroused for the 
sport this year will no doubt carry over into the years to come. 

It is up to every man in the college to participate in the Men's Club activities 
in order to make the organization a success from year to year. Why not put the 
Men's Club on the map? 

John A. Julin, Secretary 



MEN'S CLUB PLAY 
"HERE COMES CHARLIE" 

Cast of Characters 

Nora Malone, Irish maid Raymond Burnett 

Tim McGrill, Irish man-of-law '. Phillip Wilbur 

Mrs. Fanny Farnham, arrogant society matron Richard Dwyer 

Larry Elliot, masterful, vase-smashing hero Edward Skahill 

Ted Hartley, confirmed bachelor Frank Bailey 

Vivian Smythe-Kersey, scheming society butterfly John Julin 

Uncle Aleck Twiggs, breezy country uncle George Leonard 

Charlie, naive country maiden Gordon Parsons 

Mrs. Caroline Smythe-Kersey, society parasite John True 

Mortimer Smythe-Kersey, vacuous li'l brother Robert Perry 



Directed by Miss Adelaide Moffitt 
Stage Manager — Howard Rounseville 
Property Manager — Ralph Nelson 
Publicity — Gail Cosgrove 
Music by Miss Rand 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 4 — M. Russell, E. Cole, J. Smith, E. Church, M. Reposa, M. Tierney, C. Farr, M. Mahady, 

R. Wynot, M. Riordan. 
Row 3— M. McDonald, V. Cochrane, A. Cruice, B. Bartington, H. Cassels, H. Webber, D. Bell, 

M. Keohan, M. Bentley, R. Leonard. 
Row 2 — E. Raymond, K. Gavin, I. Jenkins, H. Crowdis, E. Reynolds, E. Lafaver, M. Shaw, 

K. Flaherty. 
Row 1 — M. Dunphy, C. Larsen, D. Ash, E. Dix, M. Bromley, B. Rymur. 

KINDERGARTEN -PRIMARY CLUB 

President Ernestine Reynolds 

Vice-President Eunice Warner 

Secretary Evelyn Lafaver 

Treasurer Hazel Crowdis 

Kindergarten-Primary Club's first meeting was a party welcoming new members. 
There was much to tell them about the coming programs. 

We have had some very outstanding speakers including Miss Julia Jacoby of 
Wheaton and Miss Florence Rice. They told us of their work in the kindergarten 
and nursery school field. 

In February we had a Valentine Social, and enjoyed hearing Miss Elizabeth 
Spargo, a teacher in the Brookline Primary School and also an instructor in the Boston 
Training School. 

Dr. Eugene Philbrook gave us a very interesting nature lecture using pictures he 
had taken himself. We thought that the Garden Club would enjoy him too, so its 
members were our guests. Tea was served before the meeting. 

In May we had our annual banquet when Miss Lucy Wheelock was our guest 
speaker. On the following morning Miss Wheelock spoke to the entire student 
body during Chapel period. 

To Miss Marks we owe much appreciation for making possible so fine a year's 
program. Most of our speakers were personal friends of our adviser. 

Evelyn Lafaver, Secretary. 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 




Row 3 — J. Austin. F. Pratt, I. Jenkins, C. Griffiths. C. Gilmartin, T. Wolfson, A. Surinski, E. Lafaver. 
Row 2 — H. Cassels, T. Hill, E. Appleford, R. Calen, F. Ferguson, A. Sawyer, H. Kelly. 
Row 1 — E. James, M. von Bergen, M. Salo, E. Moura, Miss Rand, R. Cushing, M. Gilliatt. 



CHOIR 



Student Director — Eliza Moura 



SOPRANOS 

Jane Austin 
Rita Cushing 
Catherine Gilmartin 
Florence Ferguson 
Edith James 
Evelyn Lafaver 
Eliza Moura 
Alma Nye 



SECONDS 

Eleanor Appleford 
Ruth Calen 
Carol Griffiths 
Thelma Gunderson 
Isabelle Jenkins 
Helen Kelly 
Florence Pratt 
Mary Salo 
Althea Sawyer 
Marie Von Bergen 
Thelma Hill 



ALTOS 

Helen Cassels 
Dorothy Cushman 
Margaret Gilliatt 
Betty Bartington 
Ann Surinski 
Dorothy Whittemore 
Thelma Wolfson 
Elizabeth Wastcoaf 



One of the first traditions of Bridgewater is the singing of responses by the choir 
Wednesday and Friday mornings. This body is made up of members of the Women's 
Glee Club who are interested in an extra-curricular activity, the aim of which is to serve 
the college by bringing good music to the students. 

Eliza Moura, Student Director 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 4 — B. Hayden, R. Murphy, M. Chaput, L. Shaw, V. Chassey, C. Griffiths, M. LeBourdais, 
R. Lane, A. Carr, B. Albret, E. Gurney, E. Hall, E. Campbell, G. French, R. Flaherty, 
T. Wolfson, L. Andrews, R. Cushing, N. MacLeod. 

Row 3 — E. Denault, E. Wastcoat, B. Bartington, B. Trufson, V. Kundiz, M. Gauszis, H. Kelly, 
M. Donahoe, A. Puro, B. Ludden, F. Ferguson, R. Calen, A. Sawyer, D. Lincoln, T. Hill, 
E. Appleford, H. Webber, D. Cheetham, H. Cassels, M. von Bergen. 

Row 2— B. Walton, F. Gillis, M. Eyre, D. Norton, M. Sullivan, I. Jenkins, L. Eldridge, M. Salo, 
Miss Rand, E. Moura, M. Gillian, R. Gonin, C. Gilmartin, H. Edwards, E. James. 

Row 1 — K. Thebodo, E. Mosher, W. Spanick, F. Pratt, E. Lafaver, J. Austin, K. Flaherty, M. Bromley, 
V. Viner, R. Maurer. 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

Director Miss Frieda Rand 

President Mary Salo 

Vice-President Eliza Moura 

Secretary Margaret Gilliatt 

Librarians Louise Eldridge 

Isabel Jenkins 

An active year (or the Glee Club was begun as soon as the try-outs were held 
last fall to fill the vacancies caused by graduation. Thirty new members were in- 
vited to join. A successful year was prophesied at the first meeting. 

A new feature was introduced into Glee Club this year — that of singing to the 
several retired faculty members of the College. The annual custom of caroling at 
our President's home after the faculty reception was continued. 

After Christmas the work for our public appearance steadily progressed. The 
club had its first appearance before the school on January twenty-eight. The 
annual spring concert, assisted by a well-known guest artist, was greatly enjoyed 
both by the appreciative audience and by Glee Club members. 

After the spring concert, rehearsals for Baccalaureate and Commencement 
music began to make us realize that graduation was not far off. 

The success of our year's program has depended a great deal on our director, 
Miss Rand. "Put all you have in a thing and it will be a success." 

Margaret Gilliatt, Secretary 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 



IV. 
V. 



CONCERT PROGRAM 

Shakespeare Songs 

"When Daisies Pied" Arne 

"Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind" Arne-Shelley 

"I Know a Bank" Horn 

"How Sweet the Moonlight Sleeps" Rathbone 

Solo Group 

German Songs 

"Traume" Wagner 

"Frussreise" Wolf 

"Gute Nacht" German Folk Song 

Solo Group 

English Songs 

"My Love Dwelt in a Northern Land" Elgar 

"The Snow" Elgar 

"Hear the Sledges with the Bells" Robertson 



Austin, Jane 
Beaton, Elmira 
Bromley, Marie 
Chaput, Marjorie 
Chassey, Viola 
Cushing, Rita 
Denault, Edna 
Eldridge, Louise 
Ferguson, Florence 
French, Dorothy 



Bartington, Betty 
Calen, Ruth 
Cronin, Ruth 
Edwards, Helen 
Flaherty, Katherine 
Flaherty, Ruth 
Gauszis, Mary 



Albret, Barbara 
Andrews, Louise 
Appleford, Eleanor 
Bartley, Mary 
Carr, Alice 
Campbell, Eleanor 
Chase, Virginia 



GLEE CLUB MEMBERS 

SOPRANOS 
French, Gertrude 
Gillis, Florence 
Gilmartin, Catherine 
Haley, Alice 
James, Edith 
Jenkins, Isabel 
Lafaver, Evelyn 
LeBourdais, Marie 
Lincoln, Doris 
Lindberg, Carolyn 

SECOND SOPRANOS 

Hall, Eleanor 
Hayden, Bettina 
Hill, Thelma 
Kelley, Helen 
Kundiz, Violet 
Murphy, Rita 
Salo, Mary 

ALTOS 
Cheetham, Dorothy 
Donahue, Mary 
Eyre, Muriel 
Gilliatt, Margaret 
Griffiths, Carol 
Gurney, Elizabeth 
Lane, Rachel 



MacLeod, Norma 
Moura, Eliza 
Norton, Dorothy 
Nye, Alma 
Puro, Alii 
Spanick, Wanda 
Sullivan, Mary 
Thebodo, Kathryn 



Sawyer, Althea 
Shaw, Lillian 
Trulson, Beatrice 
Viner, Virginia 
Von Bergen, Marie 
Wastcoat, Elizabeth 
Webber, Helen 



Ludden, Bernice 
Maurer, Ruth 
Mosher, Ernine 
Pratt, Florence 
Walton, Barbara 
Waters, Doris 
Wolfson, Thelma 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 



a, 



.o 



ml 9. 



if f f f f '-'lit** % f^| 



Row 3 — C. Medvetz, H. Baptiste, W. Coulter, G. Johnston, F. Moran, R. Cronin, E. Mathews, 

J. Peebles, T. Michelson. 
Row 2 — J. Barrows, M. Francis, S. Knuttunen, D. Whittemore, P. Farnham, Miss Rand, J. McCarthy, 

B. Cleaves, E. Gurney, F. Crooker. 
Row 1 — H. Paterson, C. Kaufman, L. Andrews, B. Trulson, R. Bumpus, D. Turner, B. Albret, E. Hall, 

E. Sisson, R. Turner, H. Russell, I. Walmsley, A. Athan, R. Emery, J. Sherman, H. Lutted. 



ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL 





VIOLINS 


Albret, B., Concert Mistress 


Hancock, J. 


Hall, E. 


Paterson, H. 


Andrews, L. 


Bumpus, R. 


Trulson, B. 


Kaufman, C. 


Lutted, H. 


Bartley, M. 




Turner, R. 


VIOLA 


VIOLINCELLOS 


Baptiste, H. 


Knuttenen, S. 




Gurney, E. 


CLARINETS 


Cleaves, B. 


McCarthy, J. 


Whittemore, D 


Sisson, E. 




Medvetz, C. 




Walmsley, 1. 


FLUTE 


Gardner, C. 


Mathews, E. 


TROMBONES 


HORN 


Johnston, G. 


Francis, M. 


Farnham, P. 





Russell, H. 
Sherman, J. 
Athan, A. 
Crooker, F. 
Emery, R. 



SAXAPHONE 

Turner, D. 

TRUMPETS 
Peebles, J. 
Michelson, T. 

PERCUSSION 

Moran, F. 

PIANO 
Cronin, R. 



f ■ 



19 3 6 
CLUBS 



ORCHESTRA 

Conductor Miss Frieda Rand 

Student Director Herman Baptiste 

Assistant Student Director Mary Bartley 

Librarian Justin McCarthy 

Assistant Librarian Elizabeth Gurney 

Secretary Eleanor Sisson 

From a small group with but a few members, the orchestra has steadily grown 
to rank among the leading organizations of the college. This year many Day 
Students have been added to the enrollment. This has given the orchestra a wider 
scope from which to choose its members. As a result it has been greatly improved 
and has shown much better instrumentation. 

The work of the year has been more varied than in former years. An interesting 
feature was the sectional or group work which included a string ensemble and a trio. 

As well as providing music for several of the dramatic productions of the college, 
the members of the orchestra contributed toward making the Wednesday morning 
chapel programs more enjoyable. Musical selections were given by the group as a 
whole and by individuals. 

The annual Spring Concert was presented in March. The concert principle was 
Beethoven's Symphony No. 1 . 

During the year a new set of tympani was purchased by the orchestra. 

The work and success of the orchestra was due to the fine and capable leadership 
of our conductor, Miss Rand. 

Eleanor Sisson, Secretary 



LULLABY 

Sleep and dream of purple colors, 
Pansy-dark and freshly-cool. 
Orchids framed by ferns, with mosses, 
Twilight shadows in a pool. 

Lilac fragrance drifting eastward, 
Royal Iris flecked with dew. 
Purple beach leaves rustling gently, 
Drowsy world 'neath hazy blue. 

— Catherine Reilly. 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 



G P €3* ^£> 




Row 4 — J. Metevier, F. Crooker, E. Bongarzone, F. Bailey, T. Michelson, H. Smith, T. Newbury, 

T. Ehrhardt. 
Row 3 — L. Hanlon, J. McGovern, E. Mathews, J. McCarthy, P. Farnham, C. Blair, E. Taitz, G. Parsons. 
Row 2 — G. Johnston, R. Dwyer, G. Leonard, D. Holmes, C. Medvetz, P. Wilbur, J. Barrows. 
Row 1 — J. Peebles, H. Paterson, A. Mastovic, J. Di Nardo, A. Dorosz, W. McGhee. 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

Director Miss Frieda Rand 

President Daniel Holmes 

Vice-President Charles Medvetz 

Secretary George Leonard 

A men's glee club has again been formed this year. Although late in starting, 
the club has had a successful year. In all there have been nearly forty aspirants for 
membership, of whom sixteen were Freshmen. From this group twenty-five or thirty 
were selected to represent the Men's Glee Club. 

The following are the selections which were sung at the concert given by the 
Men's Glee Club this spring. 

"Adeste Fideles" Traditional 

"Who Will O'er the Downs?" de Pearsall 

"Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones" 1 7fh Century German 

"Hob a Derry Danno" Welsh Folk Song 

"Care Flies from the Lad that is Merry" Moffat 

"Oft in the Stilly Night" Old Irish 

"Absent" Metcalf 

"In Picardie" Osgood 

"Hunter's Farewell" Mendelssohn 

"To Thee, Oh Country" Eichberg 




ATHLETH 



A 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 



MEMBERS OF EXECUTIVE BOARD, ADVISORY 
BOARD AND COUNCIL - W. A. A. 

Executive Board 

President Alice Halloran 

Vice-President Cornelia Sullivan 

Treasurer Barbara Schmalz 

Recording Secretary Esther Thorley 

Corresponding Secretary Dorothy Bearse 



Advisory Board 



Head of Archery 
Head of Baseball 
Head of Basketball 



Eunice Perkins 
Anna Sullivan 
Evelyn Whifty 



Head of Bicycle-riding Madeline Connell 

Head of Dancing Margaret Cassels 

Head of Etc. Sports Eleanor Campbell 

Head of Golf Jeanette Smith 

Head of Health Thelma Westerling 

Head of Hikes Marilyn Francis 

Head of Hockey Margaret Buckley 

Head of Soccer Anna Drinkwater 

Head of Tenniquoit Marjorie Candy 

Head of Tennis Phyllis Esau 

Head of Volleyball Carol Farr 



A1 Virginia Prairio 

AS Katherine Gilmartin 

A3 Ruth Davis 

A4 Rebecca Faunce 

B 1 Jessie Place 

B S Lena Nardozzi 

B 3 Harriet Robinson 

B 4 Catherine Branley 



W. A. A. Leaders 
C1 . 



Anne Wehter 

CS Virginia Chadwick 

C3 Dorothy Cushman 

C4 Dorcas Moulson 

D1 Gertrude Currier 

DS RitaKelleher 

D3 Geraldine Behan 

D4 Katherine Lahey 



19 3 6 
ATHLETICS 





£.£. 


j& A £V 






1 9* # 1 




r.ii tJl 


Qk j <QB ^ , 


§pp| 






7 j 

1 



Row 4 — A. Sullivan, D. Cushman, H. Robinson, E. Campbell, V. Chadwick, M. Buckley, P. Esau, 

D. Moulson. 
Row 3 — J. Smith, R. Faunce, K. Lahey, G. Behan, E. Perkins, R. Kelleher, G. Currier, M. Conned, 

M. Francis. 
Row 2 — H. Cassels, Miss Decker, B. Schmalz, D. Bearse, A. Halloran, M. Candy, E. Thorley, 

Miss Caldwell, A. Wehter. 
Row 1 — J. Place, T. Westerling, L. Nardozzi, V. Prario. 

W. A. A. 

President Alice Halloran 

. n . j Cornelia Sullivan 

Vice-Presidents l la ■ ■ r j 

( Marione Landy 

Corresponding Secretary . Dorothy Bearse 

Recording Secretary Esther Thorley 

Treasurer Barbara Schmaltz 

For W. A. A. this has been a year of many innovations and improvements. 
W. A. A.'s great stride forward has been its automatic membership which has reached 
out to include all the women of the college. 

Because of the change from a club to a large organization, many constitutional 
amendments have been made. So that these amendments and anything else of 
interest concerning the organization might be known to all members, handbooks 
have been published. 

In the fall Miss Elizabeth Leavens of Boston gave to about thirty interested 
members of our organization a more intensive campfire course than the one given 
by her the previous year. One thing accomplished by this group, which has given 
pleasure to all members of W. A. A., is the stone fireplace constructed in the garden. 

This year the conference of the Athletic Association of Massachusetts Teachers 
Colleges was held at Bridgewater on November 1 and 2. The central theme of the 
conference was "The Modem Dance," which is one of the newer trends in women's 
activities today. The conference was climaxed with a performance of a dance group 
from New York University and a lecture by John Martin, noted dance critic. 

Dorothy Bearse, Corresponding Secretary 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 




Row 2 — J. Horton, P. Casey, D. Holmes, T. Michelson. 
Row 1— J. Nolan, Mr. Kelly, F. Moran. 



B. T. C. A. A. 

President John Nolan 

Vice-President. Francis Moran 

Secretary Paul Casey 

Treasurer James Horton 

The B. T. C. A. A. sponsored a very successful play day for junior high school 
boys in October 1935. The men of the different classes carried out the program. 

On February 1, 1936, an informal dance was sponsored by the A. A. in the 
gymnasium. We feel that it was one of the pleasantest social events of the season. 

As is the custom, the A. A. supported the various athletic activities of the college. 
This year the sports program included soccer, basketball, baseball and tennis. The 
council hopes that each successive year will be as successful in athletics as this year 
has proved to be. 

Paul Casey, Secretary 



19 3 6 
ATHLETICS 



BASEBALL TEAM 



1935 SEASON 

Captain-Coach ......... Owen Kiernan 

Manager .......... Raymond Cook 

1935 Team 

Catcher E. Koskela 

Pitchers R. Nickerson, C. Whitcomb 

First Base . . . O. Kiernan 

Second Base . . . . . . . K. Coombs, C. Wintermeyer 

Third Base .......... E. Johnson 

Shortstop ........... E. Bowles 

Left Field C. Kelleher 

Center Field . . . . . . . . .J. Barrows, M. Nash 

Right Field i . J. Nolan, G. Long 

1936 SEASON 

Captain .......... R. Nickerson 

Coach ........... E. Bowles 

Manager ........... D. Holmes 

Nearly all of last season's veterans were on hand with the addition of many 
promising Freshmen, when Coach Bowles called out the 1936 candidates. 

The players were severely handicapped this year in having no home diamond on 
which to practice. Mr. Warren, Superintendent of the State Farm, had, however, 
enabled several home games to be scheduled by offering the team the use of his 
ball field. 

1936 Schedule 

Assumption College (two games) 

Harvard Junior Varsity 

Newport Naval Training Station (two games) 

New Bedford Textile 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Fitchburg Teachers College 

New Britain Teachers College 

Dean Academy 



19 3 6 
ALPHA 



£% 



BTC.«»TC 





>»e. 






Row 3 — A. Dorosz, R. Zeoli, J. Szematowicz, C. Whitcomb, V. Zubrzyeki, A. Mastovic, J. Horton. 
Row 2 — E. Skahill, T. Ehrhardt, G. Morrison, Captain J. Nolan, G. Parsons. H. Smith. 
Row 1— C. Medvetz, W. Nolan. 

SOCCER TEAM 

The 1935 Varsity Soccer Team enjoyed a fairly successful season, winning 
fifty per cent of the games played. The objective game of the season, the Fitchburg 
game, ended in a tie score. Since this tie broke Fitchburg 's supremacy in soccer 
over a span of years, Bridgewater claimed a moral victory. 

For the first time in three years, Bridgewater was able to invite colleges to compete 

on a Bridgewater soccer field. The Training School playground was used for the home 

games, which numbered five. 

SOCCER SCHEDULE AND SCORES 

Bridgewater vs. Dean Academy 
Bridgewater vs. Tabor Academy 
Bridgewater vs. Harvard Jr. Varsity 
Bridgewater vs. Fitchburg . 
Bridgewater vs. New Bedford Textile 
Bridgewater vs. M. I. T. . 
Bridgewater vs. American International College 
Bridgewater vs. Alumni .... 



7-2 
2-1 
1-0 
2-2 
0-2 
2-4 
1-2 
3-2 



HIGHLIGHTS OF THE SEASON 

Most goals scored — Parsons, crack center forward. Although Parsons was able 
to play in only three games, his total of eight goals was far ahead of any other single 
player. 

Best play — Skahill saving a "sure" goal at Harvard after goalie had been 
drawn from goal. 

Worst play — Nolan missing penalty kick in American International game with 
a chance to tie the game. 



19 3 6 
ATHLETICS 




Row S — Mr. Huffington, V. Bodwell, M. Nash, J. Augustine, E. Bowles, R. Stewart, T. Michelson. 
Row 1 — J. Nolan, S. Loveft, C. Daley, Captain P. Olenick, J. Long, D. Pitcher. 



BASKETBALL TEAM 

Under the able coaching of Mr. Huffington, the Basketball Team has this year 
completed the most successful season of the past four years. The great historic event 
of the basketball season was the winning of the Harrington Trophy from Fitchburg 
Teachers College on the night of February 8. Almost two hundred loyal rooters 
accompanied the players to Fitchburg to help the boys to win the Trophy, which 
Fitchburg has held for a number of years. 

This year the practice of maintaining a Junior Varsity was begun, and it met with 
such great success that a more extensive program has been planned for the squad 

next year. 

BASKETBALL SCHEDULE AND SCORES 

Bridgewater vs. Alumni ........... 37-31 

Bridgewater Jr. Varsity vs. Alumni Jr. Varsity . 29-1 8 

Bridgewater vs. Northeastern Freshmen . . . . . 29-35 

Bridgewater vs. Assumption . . . : . . . . . . . . 22-23 

Bridgewater vs. Harvard Jr. Varsity ......... 22-1 1 

Bridgewater vs. Salem ............ 28-25 

Bridgewater Jr. Varsity vs. Salem Jr. Varsity ........ 32-6 

Bridgewater vs. Northeastern Freshmen ......... 37-35 

Bridgewater vs. Dean Academy .......... 38-30 

Bridgewater vs. Fitchburg ............ 27-22 

Bridgewater vs. Assumption ........... 30-19 

Bridgewater vs. Harvard Jr. Varsity ......... 1 2-1 7 

Bridgewater Jr. Varsity vs. Hyqnnis ......... 30-27 

Bridgewater vs. New Britain ........... 22-32 

Bridgewater vs. Salem ............ 27-26 

Bridgewater Jr. Varsity vs. Salem Jr. Varsity . 26-14 

Bridgewater Jr. Varsity vs. St. Patrick's 32-18 

Bridgewater vs. Newport N. T. S . . 28-44 

Bridgewater vs. New Britain ........... 31-46 

Bridgewater vs. Newport N. T. S 20-33 

Bridgewater Jr. Varsity vs. Hyannis ......... 30-31 

Bridgewater vs. Dean Academy .......... 33-19 



Haste thee, nymph, and bring with thee 
Jest, and youthful Jollity, 
Quips and cranks and wanton wiles, 
Nods and becks and wreathed smiles, 
Such as hang on Hebe's cheek, 
And love to live in dimple sleek; 
Sport that wrinkled Care derides, 
And Laughter holding both his sides." 
— Milton. 




YES? 

Forgive me if I speak my woe, 

My tale of yesterday. 

Just now it seems so long ago 

And, oh, so far away. 

I knew he never could be mine 

Forever or for long. 

But still I gave the lover's sign 

And sang the lover's song. 

I knew I'd be a fool to go 

With him, a long short mile, 

And yet I went so fast, and slow 

And loved him for a while. 

And now he's gone and I'm alone 

But we're together yet 

Though he's not here, he's still my own 

Ah, yes, my cheeks are wet. 

Forgive me if I spoke my heart, 

I'm just a fool you know. 

Elsie Anderson. 



I hoped our love would linger in 
Your soul — a thing above 
The common cry where women dwell, 
Where man, in grief, will tear 
The roots from out the sin-soaked earth 
His destiny to bear. 

I thought perhaps it would not be 
A light love song to you, 
But rather, more a gift of gods 
A sweet, rare, precious wine 
Made known to only chosen few 
That see it clearly shine. 

Elsie Anderson. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



C. K. GROUSE COMPANY 



North Attleboro 
Massachusetts 



Makers of the 
BRIDGEWATER STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE RINGS 

and Manufacturers of 
CLUB and FRATERNITY PINS 



We wish to extend sincere compliments 
to the Class of 1936 — -and express the 
wish that the future of each member 
be bright with success and happiness. 



VAN DALE 

CLASS PHOTOGRAPHER 



Distinctive Portraits — 
Oil Paintings — 
Etchings — Pastels — 
Home, Studio, Commercial, 
Illustrative, and 
School Photography. 



255 Main Street 



Pawtucket 



Rhode Island 



COMPLIMENTS 


COMPLIMENTS 


OF 


OF 


Advertisers Engraving 


RUTH and KENNETH 


Company 


WAKEFIELD 


¥ 




Providence Rhode Island 


Auburn %\^^ Whitman, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

ALBERT F. HUNT, M. D. 



Bridgewarer 



Massachusetts 



BOLTON - SMART CO., INC. 

Purveyors To 

Hotels, Restaurants, Clubs, Schools, Institutions and Steamships 

Dealers in 

Beef, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Poultry, Fish, Butter, Cheese, Eggs, and Relishes 

19-25 South Market Street 41 Fish Pier 

BOSTON 

LAFayette 1900 — Connecting All Departments 



The Grace M. Abbott Teachers' Agency 

Grace M. Abbott, Manager 

1 20 Boylston Street Boston 

Member National Association of Teachers' Agencies 




Records show that there is 
no safer place for your savings 
than in a mutual savings bank 



BRIDGEWATER SAVINGS BANK 



BRIDGEWATER 



MASSACHUSETTS 



THE BOSTON MUSIC CO. 

Publishers and Dealers 

116 Boylston Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 

RECORDS 
Classical Popular Educational 
Victor Decca 

Columbia Brunswick 

For Your Records 
And Other Musical Requirements 
Write, 'Phone or Visit 

THE BOSTON - - 
MUSIC COMPANY 

116 Boylston St., Boston 

Hancock 1561 



Students Returning in September 

Will Find 
Lamps Wastebaskets Book-Ends 

Desk Sets Blotters 

Magazine Racks Stationery 

Ink Pencils 

All Articles Needed 
At The 

Bridgewater Gift Shop 

44 Central Square 
Bridgewater, Mass. 



Prompt Service Telephone 71 

W. H. LUDDY & SON 

BUSSES and SEDANS 
TRUCKING and FURNITURE MOVING 

71 North Central Street East Bridgewater, Massachusetts 



HOME MADE CANDY 

LUCY BRALEY'S CANDY KITCHEN 

South Middleboro, Massachusetts Route 28 to Cape Cod 

Special Rates to School Clubs 

The Electrolux Gas Refrigerator 

HAS NO MOVING PARTS TO WEAR OUT 

Have one installed in your home for 30 days without obligation 

BROCKTON GAS LIGHT COMPANY 
Bridgewater Telephone Mass. 

Bridgewater 701 

Established 1930 Cor. Main and Center 

HARRY BROWNE'S 
SPORT SHOP 



Second Floor 


86 Main Street 


Over Waldorf 


Brockton 


RELIABLE ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 


Massachusetts 



Outfitter to Bridgewater State Teachers College Athletic Association 



HILLCREST FARMS DAIRY Inc. 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

West Bridgewafer Massachusetts 

Telephone— 7926-W 

"Best wishes for the 1936 edition of Alpha" 

H. F. Soderholm, Proprietor 



Telephone— 2892 

DEL BROTHERS 

Wholesale Dealers in Bananas 
53-55 Crescent Street Brockton, Mass. 



THE FIELD COMPANY 

290 MONTELLO STREET BROCKTON, MASS 

Confectionery Soda Fountain Supplies 

Simpson Spring Beverages 



BRADY'S DINER 

Wishes Good Luck and Success to the 
Graduating Class of 1936 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 

H. H. DUDLEY COMPANY, INC. 

Druggists 

2 Central Square Bridgewater, Mass. 

BARNEY N. KATZ FURNITURE COMPANY, INC. 

Complete Home Furnishings 

Brockton and , Bridgewater 

Massachusetts 



' COMPLIMENTS 
OF THE 

NEMASKET TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 



Cape Cod Motor Line 



DORR'S PRINT SHOP 
Printers 





The United States Supreme Court states: 




"Goodwill is the disposition of the 




customer to return to the place where 


COMPLIMENTS 


he has been well treated!" 




For 114 Years 


OF 


We have specialized in the finest quality 




butter and fresh eggs at retail and whole- 


BRIDGEWATER 
ICE AND 


sale and our institution trade includes 
the State Teachers College. 


COAL 


H. A. 
HOVEY & COMPANY 


CO. 


32 Faneuil Hall Market 




35 North Market Street 




Just tefephone CAP. 0930 




Boston Massachusetts 



YEAR BOOKS . . . 



must portray a lasting impression of worth and character. 
To create such books . . . distinctively . . . readable, 
conventionally modern and of high quality . . . necessi- 
tates ingenious typography and skillful workmanship. 

WARREN PRESS 

160 Warren Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Printers of the "Alpha' 



Isabel's Beauty Salon 

Eugene and Realistic Permanents 

and 

All Branches of Beauty Work 

Central Square 
Bridgewater Massachusetts 

Telephone 2281 



To all members of the Teachers Col- 
lege and those connected with it, we 
use this space to thank you for your 
patronage during the past year. 

THE BOOTERY 



Ralph W. Case 
Proprietor 



Bridgewater 
Massachusetts 



Eastern Grain Company 

Bridgewater Massachusetts 

Distributors of WIRTHMORE Feeds 
Use WIRTHMORE Feeds for best results 
WIRTHMORE WIRTHMORE 



Poultry 
Feeds 



Dairy and Stock 
Feeds 



Bridgewater - - 
Radio Company 

40 Central Sq. Bridgewater, Mass. 

PROMPT SERVICE 



Make your "Card Catalogue" alive with Wilson-Way Photos 
WILSON-WAY SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY Cambridge, Mass. 




To the Graduating Class 

Congratulations and best wishes for a successful future 

CENTRAL SQUARE PHARMACY THE REXALL STORE 

Bridge water, Massachusetts 



PLAYS 



OPERAS 



COSTUMES 

for 

CARNIVALS PAGEANTS 



MASQUERADES 



HAYDEN COSTUME COMPANY 



786 Washington Street 
Boston, Mass. 



Hancock 4346 



J. M. Vine, Prop. 



HARRISON-SIMPSON COMPANY 

Engravers and Printers 

Manufacturers of 

Diplomas, Dance Programs and Favors, Neway Albums, Cloth Photo Hinges, 

Personal Directories 

11 OTIS STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

ALFRED'S BEAUTY PARLOR 

Permanent Waves 

Haircutting Marcelling Shampooing Finger Waves Scalp Treatments 

11 years Experience 
ALFRED SOUZA Room 2 Bridgewater 

Proprietor Telephone 371 Massachusetts 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

BART CASEY 



$25 



MICHAELS — STERN 

C ii >• 



$35 



JOHNSON-SWEENEY CO. 



108 Main St. 



Brockton, Mass. 



,\U~4^c~<7y7^C 



&j£*C^-^ 



rU, 



fad 1 £x<uJt£ tf:3d' M 
Sjd^ j&&Uir#L /:3d dt 



?: /d 

$:30 
J0-3& 
11:34 



t: 



>. 



^